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Latest Inequality & Social Policy In the News

John Harvard's Journal: Kennedy School Centers

John Harvard's Journal: Kennedy School Centers

June 17, 2016

Harvard Magazine | Notes that David T. Ellwood, Scott M. Black professor of political economy and HKS Dean from 2004 to 2015, has been appointed director of the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy. "He also chairs the U.S. Partnership on Mobility from Poverty, an academic-practitioner collaboration aiming to create expanded paths for economic and social advancement. Allison professor of economics Lawrence Katz and Beren professor of economics N. Gregory Mankiw are among the 24 members of the partnership."

Black Caucus urges Airbnb to take reports of racism seriously

Black Caucus urges Airbnb to take reports of racism seriously

June 16, 2016

TechCrunch | The Congressional Black Caucus has called on AirbnB take further action in addressing the issues of racism and discrimination on its platform, including measures like those suggested by HBS Assistant Professor Michael Luca in a recent Washington Post article. Luca and HBS colleagues Benjamin Edelman and Dan Svirsky are the authors of a much-cited study, "Racial Discrimination in the Sharing Economy: Evidence from an Experiment."
View the research

After mass shootings, Republicans make it easier to buy guns

After mass shootings, Republicans make it easier to buy guns

June 14, 2016

Washington Post | Discusses recent study by faculty affiliate Michael Luca, Deepak Malhotra, and Christopher Poliquin, all of Harvard Business School. Luca and colleagues find a 15% increase in the introduction of gun-related bills in state legislatures following a mass shooting, but no statistically significant increase in gun laws enacted in either Democrat-led or divided state legislatures. In contrast, in states with Republican-controlled legislatures, they find a 75% increase in laws passed to loosen gun restrictions. 
View the research

After Mass Shootings, It's Often Easier to Buy a Gun

After Mass Shootings, It's Often Easier to Buy a Gun

June 14, 2016

The New York Times | Discusses recent study by faculty affiliate Michael Luca, Deepak Malhotra, and Christopher Poliquin, all of Harvard Business School. Luca and colleagues find a 15% increase in the introduction of gun-related bills in state legislatures following a mass shooting, but no statistically significant increase in gun laws enacted in either Democrat-led or divided state legislatures. In contrast, in states with Republican-controlled legislatures, they find a 75% increase in laws passed to loosen gun restrictions. 
View the research

When passengers air their fury

When passengers air their fury

June 13, 2016

Harvard Gazette | What might situational microcosms of inequality—like that experienced by air passengers—reveal about how societal income and wealth inequality play out in everyday life? New study by social psychologist Michael I. Norton of Harvard Business School and Katherine A. DeCelles of University of Toronto examines episodes of "air rage" to shed light on the social behavioral consequences of inequality.
View the research in PNAS

Teaching the Teachers

Teaching the Teachers

June 11, 2016

The Economist | Cites and quotes Thomas Kane, Walter S. Gale Professor of Education: "Thomas Kane of Harvard University estimates that if African-American children were all taught by the top 25% of teachers, the gap between blacks and whites would close within eight years. He adds that if the average American teacher were as good as those at the top quartile the gap in test scores between America and Asian countries would be closed within four years."

Also highlights work of Roland Fryer, Henry Lee Professor of Economics: "In a vast study published in March, Roland Fryer of Harvard University found that “managed professional development”, where teachers receive precise instruction together with specific, regular feedback under the mentorship of a lead teacher, had large positive effects."

In Pursuit of Political Equality

In Pursuit of Political Equality

June 10, 2016

Wall Street Journal | Profile of political theorist Danielle Allen and a discussion of her new book, Equality and Education, which is being released this month by University of Chicago Press. Allen is Professor of Government and of Education and director of the Edmund J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard.

High Earners Are Going to Hate These Retirement Proposals

High Earners Are Going to Hate These Retirement Proposals

June 9, 2016

Bloomberg | A 146-page report on how to fix Social Security and more. Results and policy proposals from the two-year Bipartisan Policy Center Commission on Retirement Security and Personal Savings. Brigitte Madrian, Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management at the Harvard Kennedy School, served on the commission.
View the report

Mehta Named Radcliffe Institute Fellow

Mehta Named Radcliffe Institute Fellow

June 9, 2016

Harvard Graduate School of Education | What Associate Professor Jal Mehta (Ph.D. '06) will be working on as a Radcliffe Institute fellow for the 2016-2017 academic year.

How Location Affects Economic and Educational Prospects

How Location Affects Economic and Educational Prospects

June 7, 2016

Harvard Kennedy School | Analyzing data on more than 100,000 Japanese- Americans interned during World War II, HKS Assistant Professor Daniel Shoag (Ph.D. '11) and co-author Nicholas Carollo (UCLA) provide new evidence on the causal effect of place. They find that camp assignment had large and lasting effects on long-term locations, on individual economic outcomes, and on economic outcomes in subsequent generations.
View the research

New book: Education and Equality, by Danielle Allen

New book: Education and Equality, by Danielle Allen

June 7, 2016

This month marks the launch of Danielle Allen's new book, Education and Equality, published by the University of Chicago Press. The Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard, Harvard Book Store, and Boston Review will host a book discussion with Allen, Professor of Government and Education, as part of the Safra Center's new "Ethics in Your World" speaker series—Jun 7, 7:00-8:00 pm, Harvard Book Store (See event details).

The Disconnected

The Disconnected

June 3, 2016

Slate | Two decades after “welfare to work,” some women are navigating life without either welfare or work. Article accompanying a new Marketplace podcast, "The Uncertain Hour," which looks back at welfare reform 20 years later. Quotes David Ellwood, Scott M. Black Professor of Political Economy.

How Kids Learn Resilience

How Kids Learn Resilience

June 3, 2016

The Atlantic | Notes and discusses economist Roland Fryer's research on incentive schemes in public school systems with high poverty rates: "As a body of work, Fryer’s incentive studies have marked one of the biggest and most thorough educational experiments in American history." Fryer, Henry Lee Professor of Economics, generally found no effect on student achievement.

Latest awards

Equitable Growth Announces 2016 Class of Grantees: Blythe George

Equitable Growth Announces 2016 Class of Grantees: Blythe George

July 20, 2016

Awardee | Blythe George, Ph.D. candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, is one of 19 new grantees in the Washington Center for Equitable Growth's 2016 class. George's research, "Those jobs ain’t coming back: The consequences of an industry collapse on two tribal reservations," will use qualitative data to explore the mechanisms that link the decline of employment options and life outcomes for males on two Native American tribal reservations, The Yurok and Hoopa Valley Reservations, located in California’s northwest.

"A member of the Yurok tribe herself, the researcher’s data provide a unique contribution ... [with] useful insights on the consequences of declining male labor force participation, particularly in non-urban settings." The award citation highlights that "From a policy engagement perspective, the rich[ness of] this qualitative work will help provide the narrative and texture that is necessary for capturing policy attention."

Robert Sampson elected to the British Academy

Robert Sampson elected to the British Academy

July 15, 2016

Awardee | Robert J. Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, has been elected a Fellow of the British Academy. The Academy elected 42 distinguished UK academics and 20 scholars from overseas institutions in recognition of their outstanding contributions to research. It also elected four Honorary Fellows, including U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen. Learn more about Robert Sampson's work at his homepage.

New Russell Sage Foundation grant: Natasha Warikoo

New Russell Sage Foundation grant: Natasha Warikoo

July 13, 2016

Awardee | Natasha Warikoo (Ph.D. '05), Associate Professor of Education at Harvard University, has been awarded  a Russell Sage Foundation grant to study "Asian Americans in Suburban America: Academic Competition, Youth Culture, and Racial Change." Warikoo will examine academic competition in two wealthy suburbs that differ in their Asian populations, exploring how group boundaries, beliefs about success, youth culture, and conceptions of race change when upwardly-mobile Asian Americans enter the public school system in these higher-income, predominantly white communities.

Judith Scott-Clayton wins Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award

Judith Scott-Clayton wins Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award

July 12, 2016

Awardee | Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. '09) is the recipient of the Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), which is awarded on the basis of  "published work that exemplifies the highest quality of research methodology, analysis, or topical writing on the subject of student financial aid or its administration." Scott-Clayton is Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Jeremy Levine receives two ASA awards for outstanding paper

Jeremy Levine receives two ASA awards for outstanding paper

July 11, 2016

Awardee | Jeremy Levine, Ph.D. '16 in Sociology, is the recipient of two American Sociological Association section awards for best graduate student paper in Community and Urban Sociology and in Political Sociology. The paper, forthcoming in the American Sociological Review, is titled "The Privatization of Political Representation: Community-Based Organizations as Nonelected Neighborhood Representatives.” Levine joins the University of Michigan faculty as Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies in September. Learn more about Levine's work at his website.

Devah Pager named to W.T. Grant Foundation Board of Trustees

Devah Pager named to W.T. Grant Foundation Board of Trustees

July 1, 2016

William T. Grant Foundation | Devah Pager, Professor of Sociology and Public Policy and Director of the Inequality & Social Policy program, will join the William T. Grant Foundation's Board of Trustees in 2017. The William T. Grant Foundation invests in research focused on reducing inequality and improving the use of research evidence to improve the lives of young people in the United States.

Pager is a former William T. Grant Scholar, a program that recognizes promising early career researchers in the in the social, behavioral, and health sciences and supports their professional development with five-year research awards. Other W.T. Grant Scholars include Inequality & Social Policy alumni David Deming (Ph.D. '10, now a Professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education), Laura Tach (Ph.D. '09, now Cornell University), and Patrick Sharkey (Ph.D. '07, now NYU), and faculty affiliate Matthew Desmond of the Harvard Sociology Department.

Jacqueline Rivers named a W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellow, 2016-2017

Jacqueline Rivers named a W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellow, 2016-2017

July 1, 2016

Awardee | Jacqueline Rivers (Ph.D. '15). The Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University has announced its fourth class of W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows. Rivers, who holds a  Ph.D. in African American Studies and Sociology at Harvard,  will work on a project titled The Power of Racial Socialization: A Form of Non-Elite Cultural Capital.

Ellora Derenoncourt awarded Louis O. Kelso fellowship

Ellora Derenoncourt awarded Louis O. Kelso fellowship

July 1, 2016

Awardee | Ellora Derenoncourt, Ph.D. candidate in Economics, is the recipient of a Louis O. Kelso fellowship from the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations for 2016-2017. Rutgers has selected 30 fellows to study broad-based employee ownership and profit-sharing in corporations. Derenoncourt will research the effects of differential levels of employee ownership benefits on employee satisfaction and quit rates.

Distinguished Career Award: ASA International Migration Section

Distinguished Career Award: ASA International Migration Section

June 18, 2016

Awardee | Mary C. Waters, M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology, is the recipient of the 2016 Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association's Section on International Migration. Waters will receive the award in a ceremony on August 23 at the ASA Annual Meeting in Seattle.

John Harvard's Journal: Students' Choice

John Harvard's Journal: Students' Choice

June 17, 2016

Harvard Magazine | James Biblarz, Ph.D. student in Sociology and Social Policy and a tutor in Eliot House, received the Undergraduate Council’s John R. Marquand Prize for exceptional advising and counseling. The prize, awarded annually in May, recognizes an individual "who contributes to the quality of undergraduate life and education," with a focus on those who bring "skill and generosity in advising, counseling, and helping students.”

Jane Mansbridge to give BJPIR Public Lecture

Jane Mansbridge to give BJPIR Public Lecture

June 9, 2016

University of Edinburgh | Jane Mansbridge, Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values, is the recipient of an honorary degree from the University of Edinburgh. Following the ceremony, she will deliver the British Journal of Politics and International Relations public lecture addressing the question of why—in a world of growing interdependence and complex challenges—we need more and more ‘legitimate coercion’.

APSA Heinz Eulau Award

APSA Heinz Eulau Award

June 8, 2016

Awardee | Ariel R. White (Ph.D. '16), now Assistant Professor of Political Science at MIT, and co-authors Noah L. Nathan and Julie K. Faller are the recipients of the American Political Science Association's Heinz I. Eulau Award for best article published in the American Political Science Review in the past calendar year. All were Ph.D. candidates in Government at the time of publication.

For their article, "What do I Need to Vote? Bureaucratic Discretion and Discrimination by Local Election Officials," the authors carried out a field experiment in which they contacted over 7,000 local election officials in 48 states responsible for providing information to voters and implementing voter ID laws. They found that election officials were significantly less likely to respond to emails sent from Latino aliases and provided responses of lower quality than they did when replying to non-Latino white aliases.  
View the research

Congratulations, new Ph.D.'s!

Congratulations, new Ph.D.'s!

May 26, 2016

Congratulations to the 14 Inequality & Social Policy doctoral fellows receiving their Ph.D.'s today, and to all the graduates who have been part of our Inequality & Social Policy community.

The Tobin Project 2016 Graduate Student Fellows: Sarah James

The Tobin Project 2016 Graduate Student Fellows: Sarah James

May 26, 2016

Awardee | Sarah James, Ph.D. student in Government and Social Policy, has been selected to participate in The Tobin Project as a 2016 Graduate Student Fellow. The Tobin Project's Graduate Student Fellows program, which draws students from universities across the country, supports student research on real-world problems in the social sciences by providing research workshops and research fellowships to enable students to carry out a specific project.  James will pursue research on "Race and Street-Level Bureaucracy in Schools: An Examination of Texas’ School-based Police Forces."  Read more about Sarah James's work at her homepage.

Torben Iversen awarded Denmark's prestigious Holst-Knudsen Prize for Scientific Research

Torben Iversen awarded Denmark's prestigious Holst-Knudsen Prize for Scientific Research

May 25, 2016

Awardee | Torben Iversen, Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy, is the recipient of one of Denmark's oldest and most prestigious science awards, the the Rigmor and Carl Holst-Knudsen Award for Scientific Research. "Again and again," the award citation notes, "Torben Iversen’s work has set the agenda for research in a variety of areas, such as the welfare state, the role of central banks, salary negotiations, education, and electoral systems."

Ariel White awarded Robert Noxon Toppan dissertation prize

Ariel White awarded Robert Noxon Toppan dissertation prize

May 24, 2016

Awardee | Ariel R. White (Ph.D. '16) has been awarded the Harvard Government Department's 2016 Robert Noxon Toppan Prize for best dissertation in political science for her dissertation titled, "Voter Behavior in the Wake of Punitive Politics." White joins the MIT faculty as Assistant Professor of Political Science in the fall.

Robert Putnam Honored with Wildavsky Award for 'Bowling Alone'

Robert Putnam Honored with Wildavsky Award for 'Bowling Alone'

May 24, 2016

Awardee | Robert Putnam, Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy, has been awarded the 2016 Aaron Wildavsky Enduring Contribution Award by the Public Policy Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA) for his 2000 book, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community...The Wildavsky Award recognizes a work, published 10-20 years earlier, that continues to influence the study of public policy. 

Brigitte Madrian named to CFPB Academic Research Council

Brigitte Madrian named to CFPB Academic Research Council

May 20, 2016

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau | In prepared remarks, CFPB Director Richard Cordray welcomes new members Brigitte Madrian (Harvard) and Ian Ayres (Yale) to CFPB's Academic Research Council and highlights the importance of consumer finance as an area of economics and policy. Madrian is the Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management at Harvard Kennedy School.

Deming Named Professor of Education

Deming Named Professor of Education

May 19, 2016

Harvard Graduate School of Education | Associate Professor David Deming (Ph.D. '10) has been promoted to full professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Deming is an economist interested in educational inequality and the impact of education policies on long-term outcomes.

“David’s scholarship addresses fundamentally important questions in exceptionally innovative ways. The rigor and relevance of his work — on subjects ranging from the long-term benefits of the Head Start program, the value of degrees from for-profit colleges, and the effects of racial segregation on academic achievement and life outcomes — make his findings absolutely essential reading for academics and policymakers alike,” said Dean James Ryan.

Latest commentary and analysis

Hearing on Impact of House Republican ACA Repeal Bill

Douglas Elmendorf joins Hearing on Impact of House Republican ACA Repeal Bill

March 16, 2017

Douglas Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School, spoke as an expert witness before a House Democratic Caucus hearing on the impact of the Affordable Health Care Act, the House Republican health care bill.

"The health care legislation supported by the House Republican leadership would take our country backward, not forward. It would do that in at least 4 important ways," Elmendorf said.

Elmendorf highlighted its reversal of progress in expanding health insurance coverage, and the inability to afford health insurance—not freedom to choose—as the main driver behind the expected rise in the numbers of uninsured. The bill "would not represent shared sacrifice for the national good but rather targeted sacrifice by lower- and middle-income Americans," Elmendorf maintained, and "would take us backward by providing a large tax cut focused on the very top of the income distribution."

On the burden to lower- and middle-income Americans, Elmendorf noted that the bill "would leave the tax subsidies for higher-income Americans fully in place and clobber the tax subsidies -- and spending subsidies -- for lower-and middle-income Americans." At the same time, "one percent of households with the highest incomes would receive 40 percent of the gains from repealing the tax increases under the ACA," Elmendorf said, citing estimates by the Tax Policy Center.
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American apartheid

American apartheid

March 16, 2017

UVA Miller Center | By Orlando Patterson, John Cowles Professor of Sociology. Volume 9 in the Miller Center's First Year 2017 project, which examines the key issues the new U.S. president must confront. The current volume, "Grappling with Tensions Over Race," also includes essays by Elizabeth Hinton (Assistant Professor of History and of African and African American Studies at Harvard), Douglas A. Blackmon, and Michael Eric Dyson (Georgetown University)
See all essays

Dani Rodrik

How Much Europe Can Europe Tolerate?

March 14, 2017

Project Syndicate | By Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School. "Today, the Union is mired in a deep existential crisis, and its future is very much in doubt. The symptoms are everywhere: Brexit, crushing levels of youth unemployment in Greece and Spain, debt and stagnation in Italy, the rise of populist movements, and a backlash against immigrants and the euro. They all point to the need for a major overhaul of Europe’s institutions," Rodrik writes.

CBS News: Douglas Elmendorf

Fmr. CBO director on new health care bill report

March 13, 2017

CBS News | Douglas Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School and Don K. Price Professor of Public Policy, joins CBSN's "Red & Blue" to discuss today's Congressional Budget Office report on the House Republican health care bill. Elmendorf served as director of the Congressional Budget Office from January 2009 to March 2015.
[Video: 8 minutes].

"...A bigger part of the reason people will lose health insurance coverage is they won’t be able to afford it, People are not maintaining access to health insurance coverage, or gaining access to health insurance coverage, in this legislation. People are being taken out of Medicaid. The subsidies are being cut back by 40% on average in insurance marketplaces. So the bill is not maintaining access and giving people freedom to choose as the Speaker suggested. It is reducing access very significantly.," Elmendorf said.

Bloomberg: Douglas Elmendorf

Why the CBO Report Is a Blow to the GOP Health Plan

March 13, 2017

Bloomberg | Douglas Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School and former director of the Congressional Budget Office, reacts to the CBO scorecard on the GOP health plan. [video: 6 minutes]

Securities and Exchange Commission Evidence Summit

Securities and Exchange Commission Evidence Summit

March 10, 2017

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission | Economist Brigitte Madrian of the Harvard Kennedy School spoke at an SEC "Evidence Summit," a public conference "to discuss...potential strategies for enhancing retail investors’ understanding of key investment characteristics such as fees, risks, returns, and conflicts of interest." 

The summit aimed to "marshal research from the fields of economics and cognitive sciences to help inform ways of thinking about investor behavior and identify areas for possible future research to be conducted under the auspices of an investor research initiative led by the Commission’s Office of the Investor Advocate."  An archive version of the webcast will be posted soon at SEC.gov.

Turning a March into a Movement

Turning a March into a Movement

March 9, 2017

HKS PolicyCast | If the Women’s March on Washington was a spark, what does it now take to fan that spark into a flame? In this week's roundtable discussion: Assistant Professor Leah Wright Rigueur, Women and Public Policy Program Executive Director Victoria Budson, and Adjunct Lecturer Tim McCarthy.

Trump attacks cities, but they’re the lifeblood of our country (Part 1)

Trump attacks cities, but they’re the lifeblood of our country (Part 1)

March 8, 2017

Washington Post | A conversation with Harvard economist Edward Glaeser. "Perhaps the most troubling division to me is the gap in prime age joblessness between urban and rural America. That gap is widening perilously," Glaeser says. "In 1980, only about nine percent of men between 25 and 54 were jobless in both urban and rural America. Today, the jobless rate is about 15 percent in America’s metropolitan areas, which is slightly below the national average, and about 19 percent outside of metropolitan America."

NABE Economic Policy Conference 2017

Economic Policy Conference: Fiscal Policy Perspectives

March 6, 2017

C-SPAN | National Association of Business Economics conference session with Douglas Elmendorf of the Harvard Kennedy School and Glenn Hubbard of Columbia Business School. Elmendorf, Dean and Don K. Price Professor of Public Policy, served as Director of the Congressional Budget Office from January 2009 through March 2015. Hubbard served as Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers from 2001 to 2003.
View conference program and materials

Robots are wealth creators and taxing them is illogical

Robots are wealth creators and taxing them is illogical

March 5, 2017

Financial Times | By Lawrence Summers, Charles W. Eliot University Professor "Why tax in ways that reduce the size of the pie rather than ways that assure that the larger pie is well distributed?," Summers writes. "There are many better approaches. Governments will, however, have to concern themselves with problems of structural joblessness. They likely will need to take a more explicit role in ensuring full employment than has been the practice in the US." This article also appeared in the Washington Post.

Race, Segregation, and Politics

Linking Multiracial Coalitions and Class-Based Appeals

March 4, 2017

NYU Furman Center | By Lawrence Bobo, W. E. B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences, Harvard University. Part of the "The Dream Revisted: Race, Segregation, and Politics," a discussion with J. Phillip Thompson (MIT), and also featuring responses by Patrick Bayer (Duke) and Christina Greer (Fordham).

Why We Don’t Value Flextime Enough

Why We Don’t Value Flextime Enough

March 3, 2017

Wall Street Journal | By Ray Fisman (Boston University) and Michael Luca (Harvard Business School). Most American workers won’t trade less pay for a more flexible schedule, but they’re underestimating the role of free time in personal happiness, Fisman and Luca write. Among the research discussed in this article, a recent study by Alexandre Mas (Princeton University) and Amanda Pallais (Harvard Economics), "Valuing Alternative Work Arrangements."
View the research

'Deportation Nation'

'Deportation Nation'

March 2, 2017

Radio Open Source | Harvard's Mary Waters, John L. Loeb Professor of Sociology, and Roberto Gonzales, Assistant Professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education, join Daniel Kanstroom, Professor of Law at Boston College and author of  Deportation Nation: Outsiders in American History.

From Radio Open Source:
Mary Waters, sociologist at Harvard, is increasingly concerned by the parallels between mass deportation and mass incarceration. She termed the phenomenon “crimmigration.” In order to resist this system, she writes, “we need a model of a social movement that is not based in civil rights, because we have defined millions of people living in this country as being outside of civil society.

Roberto Gonzales spent 12 years following the lives of undocumented teenagers in Los Angeles. His heart-breaking account in Lives in Limbo paints a tragic portrait of squandered potential and unrealized dreams. For undocumented teenagers, adulthood marks a transition to illegality — a period of ever-narrowing opportunities. One teenager named Esperanza lamented to Roberto: “I would have been the walking truth instead of a walking shadow.”

What Could We Expect on Ed From a Justice Gorsuch?

What Could We Expect on Ed From a Justice Gorsuch?

March 1, 2017

EdNext Podcast | Arizona Supreme Court Justice Clint Bolick has been poring over Neil Gorsuch’s opinions as a federal judge to learn how he might approach the steady stream of education cases that inevitably make their way before the Supreme Court. He discusses his conclusions in this week's episode with Marty West, Associate Professor of Education  and executive edtor of Education Next.

Natasha Warikoo

The Diversity Bargain

February 28, 2017

C-SPAN Book TV | Professor Natasha Warikoo talks about her book The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities, in which she examines what college students in the U.S. and Britain think about race and diversity programs. A presentation delivered at New York University by Natasha Warikoo (Ph.D. '05), Associate Professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education.

The GOP's Long History with Black Colleges

The GOP’s Long History With Black Colleges

February 27, 2017

Politico | By Theodore R. Johnson and Leah Wright Rigueur. "In the tenous relationship between Republican leaders and historically black schools, this is the way it's been for a long time," write Johnson and Rigueur. "Politics makes for strange bedfellows—as is undoubtedly true of Trump and Talladega—but the blend of political expediency and areas of ideological overlap have proved a strong enough elixir to bring the two together and sustain a relationship over time."

Leah Wright Rigueur is an assistant professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power. Theodore R. Johnson is an Eric and Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy.

Bart Bonikowski

In Europe, nationalism rising

February 27, 2017

Harvard Gazette | Featuring interviews with Bart Bonikowski, Associate Professor of Sociology, and Michèle Lamont,  Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies and Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies.