Doctoral Fellows

ECINEQ

Stone PhD Scholars to present research at 8th ECINEQ Meeting Paris 2019

July 3, 2019

Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ) | Stone PhD Scholars Alex Albright (Economics) , Nicholas Short (Government & Social Policy), and Oren Danieli PhD'19 (Business Economics) have been selected to present papers at the eighth meeting of Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ) at the Paris School of Economics, July 3-5, 2019.

Keynote speakers will be Stefanie Stantcheva of Harvard University, Marianne Bertrand of University of Chicago, and Thomas Piketty of the Paris School of Economics.

... View preliminary program ►

Robert J. Sampson

Harvard study shows the predictive power of punishing and toxic environments on children's outcomes

May 17, 2019

Harvard Gazette
Coverage of new study by Robert Manduca, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, and Robert J. Sampson, the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, now out in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. They find that neighborhood measures of lead exposure, violence, and incarceration have strong independent predictive power, on top of standard variables, for children's life outcomes.

Ellora Derenoncourt

Ellora Derenoncourt selected for Restud Tour 2019

May 10, 2019

The Review of Economic Studies 
Ellora Derenoncourt, PhD '19 in Economics, gave seminar presentations at the London School of Economics, KU Leuven, and Sciences Po as part of the 2019 Restud Tour, May 10-17, 2019. Sponsored by The Review of Economic Studies, each year the tour selects some of the most promising graduating doctoral students in economics and finance to present their research to audiences in Europe. 

Derenoncourt will be a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University in 2019-2020, and Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Policy at UC Berkeley beginning in 2020. View the paper she presented: "Can you move to opportunity? Evidence from the Great Migration."

... View the paper ►

Angie Bautista-Chavez

Angie Bautista-Chavez named a Radcliffe Institute Graduate Student Fellow for 2019–2020

May 9, 2019

Harvard Magazine | Angie Bautista-Chavez, PhD candidate in Government, is one of three graduate student fellows who join the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's 2019-2020 cohort of fellows. Bautista-Chavez's title will be the Edna Newman Shapiro, Class of 1936, and Robert Newman Shapiro, Class of 1972, Graduate Student Fellow. Her dissertation project: Exporting Borders: The Domestic and International Politics of Migration Control.

Adam Travis named a JCHS John R. Meyer Dissertation Fellow

Adam Travis named a JCHS John R. Meyer Dissertation Fellow

May 7, 2019

Awardee | Adam Travis, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, has been named a 2019 John R. Meyer Dissertation Fellow by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies. He is exploring how different coastal real estate markets are responding to global climate change, with a particular focus on the relationship between flood hazards and home prices.

Jared Schachner

Jared Schachner named a JCHS John R. Meyer Dissertation Fellow

May 7, 2019

Awardee | Jared Schachner, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, has been named a 2019 John R. Meyer Dissertation Fellow by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies. Schachner is using Los Angeles County to examine how parents make choices about neighborhoods and schools in an era of liberalized, choice-oriented urban policies, and how those choices affect educational outcomes for children. 

Robert Manduca

Study finds gap between rich and poor growing regionally, too

May 2, 2019

Harvard Gazette | A new paper by Robert Manduca, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, now out in Social Forces.

“In 1980, only about 12 percent of the population lived in places that were especially rich or especially poor,” Manduca said. “By 2013, it was over 30 percent. So what we’re seeing is a polarization, where people are increasingly living in places that are either much richer or much poorer than the country overall.”

While part of that shift is due to sorting — the notion that high-earning people and high-paying jobs have become more geographically concentrated — Manduca shows that the rise in national income inequality can account for more than half of the economic divergence across regions that we observe.

... View the research ▶