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Latest Inequality & Social Policy In the News

Detroit

Harvard, U. of Michigan partner to boost economic opportunity in Detroit

September 12, 2018

Harvard Gazette | Harvard and the University of Michigan have formed two partnerships designed to encourage economic opportunity in Detroit and to fight the national scourge of opioid addiction. 

The Detroit-focused partnership pairs the Equality of Opportunity Project — led by Harvard’s William A. Ackman Professor of Public Economics Raj Chetty, Harvard economics Professor Nathaniel Hendren, and Brown University Associate Professor John Friedman — with the University of Michigan’s Poverty Solutions initiative, the city of Detroit, and community partners. It seeks to create interventions that can improve the livelihoods of low-income Detroit residents.

Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Writing Crime into Race

July 2, 2018

Harvard Magazine | Historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad studies one of the most powerful ideas in the American imagination. A profile of Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School.

Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy Receives $2.5 Million Gift

Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy Receives $2.5 Million Gift

March 27, 2018
Harvard Kennedy School | Harvard Kennedy School has received a $2.5 million gift from the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation to support new and ongoing work to address wealth concentration and the broader problems of inequality. The gift supports the research and outreach efforts at the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy at the Kennedy School’s Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, which serves as a nexus for work on inequality across the university. The program brings together Harvard faculty and PhD students from the social sciences who are exploring issues such as income inequality and wealth concentration, poverty and justice, opportunity and intergenerational mobility, and inequalities of race and place. Read more »
Harvard Kennedy School campus

HKS Receives $2.5 Million for Economic Inequality Research

March 27, 2018

The Harvard Crimson  | The gift will support the work of over 40 Harvard doctoral students in the social sciences who will be known as Stone PhD Scholars in Inequality and Wealth Concentration. The donation also establishes the Stone Senior Scholars program—an initiative which will invite 12 leading scholars of inequality to give lectures and coordinate events about economic opportunity and income inequality—and the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Lecture, a series of public lectures around economic inequality across the world. French economist Thomas Piketty will deliver the first lecture of the Stone series Friday at the Kennedy School’s JFK Forum.

The Rise of the 1 Percent Negates Any Progress on the Racial Income Gap

The Rise of the 1 Percent Negates Any Progress on the Racial Income Gap

March 12, 2018

Pacific Standard | Research by Robert Manduca, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, shows how the rise in income inequality in the top few percentiles of the distribution helps explain why, more than 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, black-white family income disparities in the U.S remain almost exactly the same as they were in 1968. The study, "Income Inequality and the Persistence of Racial Economic Disparities," is now out in Sociological Science.
View the research

Claudia Goldin

Wielding Data, Women Force a Reckoning Over Bias in the Economics Field

January 10, 2018
The New York Times | Claudia Goldin, Henry Lee Professor of Economics at Harvard, pointed to a recent study by Inequality & Social Policy doctoral fellow Heather Sarsons that found that women get significantly less credit than men when they co-write papers with them, as reflected in the way the paper affects their chances of receiving tenure. Heather Sarsons is a PhD candidate in Economics at Harvard.
View the research
The Real Future of Work

The Real Future of Work

January 4, 2018
Politico Magazine | Forget automation. The workplace is already cracking up in profound ways. A look at what a study by Lawrence Katz (Harvard Economics) and Alan Krueger (Princeton Economics) found about the rise in the contingent workforce and alternative work arrangements in the U.S. over the past two decades. The Katz-Krueger study is forthcoming in ILR Review.
View the research
How much does a college matter in getting a student to commencement?

How much does a college matter in getting a student to commencement?

December 29, 2017
Washington Post | Discusses study by Joshua S. Goodman and colleagues, which suggests that the college "matters more than we might think, particularly when it comes to academically marginal students."The study, authored by  Joshua Goodman of the Harvard Kenenedy School and Michael Hurwitz and Jonathan Smith  of the College Board, appears in the Journal of Labor Economics.
View the research 
Supreme Court justices may give away their votes with their voices

Supreme Court justices may give away their votes with their voices

December 21, 2017
The Economist | Political scientists hit upon a surprisingly reliable signal of how the high court will rule. Maya Sen talks about her new study, joint with Bryce J. Dietrich and Harvard colleague Ryan D. Enos, forthcoming in Political Analysis. Sen is Associate Professor at Harvard Kennedy School. Enos is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Harvard.
View the research
Inefficient equilibrium: Women and economics

Inefficient equilibrium: Women and economics

December 19, 2017
The Economist | An analysis of women's underrepresentation in economics and what the research tells us. Discusses research of Heather Sarsons, a PhD candidate in Economics, who investigated gender differences in who gets credit for jointly-authored work. Also notes steps that David Laibson, as chair of the Harvard economics department, has taken to address such issues as implicit bias in faculty search and promotion committees.
The Tax Bill that Inequality Created

The Tax Bill that Inequality Created

December 16, 2017
The New York Times | Editorial cites Harvard political scientist Theda Skocpol, who has written extensively about the unrivaled organization of donors and political activitists on the right, who have spent years methodically pushing state and federal lawmakers to cut regulations, taxes and government programs for the poor and the middle class.
The Self-Destruction of American Democracy

The Self-Destruction of American Democracy

November 27, 2017
The New York Times | Thomas B. Edsall column cites Harvard's Ryan Enos, Associate Professor of Government, and Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, also faculty members in the Department of Government and the authors of How Democracies Die, forthcoming in January 2018.
Stop the sniping, Washington Democrats. Learn from the grassroots.

Stop the sniping, Washington Democrats. Learn from the grassroots.

November 19, 2017
Washington Post | Columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. talks with political scientist Theda Skocpol, who—with Harvard colleagues Mary Waters (Harvard Sociology) and Kathy Swartz (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health)— are talking to leaders and rank-and-file citizens in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Ohio (two counties in each state) to track changes in politics since Donald Trump's election victory.
David J. Deming

Make College Free? Not So Fast. New Study Shows That Students Are Helped by Making College Better, Not Cheaper

November 19, 2017
The 74 | A recent by economists David Deming of Harvard University and Christopher Walters of the University of California, Berkeley, has found that students benefit far more when schools spend to improve their academics rather than lower their prices.
View the research... Read more about Make College Free? Not So Fast. New Study Shows That Students Are Helped by Making College Better, Not Cheaper
Year One: Resistance Research

Year One: Resistance Research

November 9, 2017
The New York Review of Books—NYR Daily | In this essay by Judith Shulevitz, political scientist Theda Skocpol talks about what she's been finding in her latest research with colleagues Katherine Swartz  (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) and Mary Waters (Harvard Sociology). The three have teamed up to study counties that went for Trump in four states that went for Trump: Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Wisconsin.

"Skocpol says she was startled to find so many flourishing anti-Trump groups in these conservative strongholds. She thinks the resistance is at least as extensive as the Tea Party at its height (a quarter of a million to three hundred thousand active members, according to her estimates). It is certainly as energized. Skocpol hasn’t seen a liberal movement like it in decades, she says."
What Trump gets wrong about 401(k)s

What Trump gets wrong about 401(k)s

October 24, 2017
Politico | Quoted: Brigitte Madrian, an economist at Harvard’s Kennedy School who has extensively studied workplace retirement plans, believes that the House GOP proposal could significantly reduce savings. 
David Deming

Social skills increasingly valuable to employers

October 23, 2017
Harvard Gazette | Employers increasingly reward workers who have both social and technical skills, rather than technical skills alone, according to a new analysis by a Harvard education economist David Deming, recently published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Deming (PhD '10) is a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Graduate School of  Education.
View the research (open access) Read more about Social skills increasingly valuable to employers
Inequality in America symposium

U.S. Scholars Home in on U.S. Inequality

October 20, 2017
Harvard Gazette | Harvard Dean of Social Science Claudine Gay convened the inaugural symposium of the FAS Inequality in America Initiative, which will include non-academic experiences and support a new postdoctoral fellowship. Learn more about the symposium and opportunities with the new initiative:
inequalityinamerica.fas.harvard.edu 

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Latest commentary and analysis

Leah Wright Rigueur “Between the Lines: The Republican Party at a Racial Crossroads”

Leah Wright Rigueur “Between the Lines: The Republican Party at a Racial Crossroads”

November 16, 2016

Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library | Leah Wright Rigueur's spoke at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan, providing "a new understanding of the interactions between African Americans and the Republican Party, and the seemingly incongruous intersection of civil rights and American conservatism." Rigueur, an historian, is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power  (Princeton University Press, 2014).

Fixing Discrimination in Online Marketplaces

Fixing Discrimination in Online Marketplaces

November 15, 2016

Harvard Business Review | By Ray Fisman (Boston University) and Michael Luca (Harvard Business School). Also cites economist Claudia Goldin's well-known article (with Cecilia Rouse) on the lessons we can learn from symphony orchestras.

Straight Talk on Trade

Straight Talk on Trade

November 15, 2016

Project Syndicate | By Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy.

Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

November 15, 2016

PBS | Historian Leah Wright Rigueur of the Harvard Kennedy School is among those featured in this four-part documentary written and hosted by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Watch Tuesday, November 15 and 22 at 8 pm on PBS. (If you miss the premiere, watch videos online)

Responding to our Oral Culture

Responding to our Oral Culture

November 11, 2016

Nieman Reports | By Danielle Allen, Professor of Government. Part of NR's "Election '16: Lessons for Journalism" series. 

Education in the Trump Presidency

Education in the Trump Presidency

November 10, 2016

HGSE Usable Knowledge | Five faculty members, inluding Thomas Kane, Walter H. Gale Professor of Economics and Education, share their thoughts on the election and its implications for education.

"As the mushroom cloud of uncertainty settles on Washington, D.C., educators should understand that the game moved out of Washington a year ago," says Kane. "The federal government handed the reins of K–12 education reform back to state and local leaders with the signing of the Every Student Succeeds Act in December 2015. We will soon see whether governors, state commissioners, school boards and district leaders are ready to step up and accept the challenge."

Why neither Christie nor Giuliani should be the next attorney general

Why neither Christie nor Giuliani should be the next attorney general

November 10, 2016

Washington Post | By Danielle Allen, a political theorist at Harvard and a contributing columnist for the Post. "We need to de-politicize the judicial branch to preserve our constitutional fabric," argues Allen. "Appoint a nonpartisan legal figure with a deep record for integrity and public service, who is squeaky clean with regard to conflicts and the appearance of conflict...Only such an appointment will make it clear that the Justice Department will protect liberty and justice for all Americans. There could be no more important early signal for the president-elect to send."

Election Autopsy

Election Autopsy

November 10, 2016

No Jargon [Podcast—Ep. 57] | With Theda Skocpol, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology. What to expect from a Trump presidency. Analyzing the factors that swayed voters, Skocpol offers insight on what the Democrats need to do moving forward. A production of the Scholars Strategy Network, No Jargon presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation.

Watch: Populism and the Future of American Politics

Watch: Populism and the Future of American Politics

November 10, 2016

American Academy of Arts & Sciences | Jennifer Hochschild, Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government, Lawrence D. Bobo, W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences, and Charles Stewart III of MIT.

Trumpcast: What does Trump’s Victory Mean for Education Policy?

Trumpcast: What does Trump’s Victory Mean for Education Policy?

November 10, 2016

EdNext Podcast | Education Next’s Paul E. Peterson (Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government) and Martin West (Ph.D ''06, Associate Professor of Education) talk about what education reforms they expect from President-elect Donald Trump. Will he move on school choice, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, Title I portability, charter schools, or something entirely unexpected? 

Seeing Red in Trump's America

Seeing Red in Trump's America

November 10, 2016

Radio OpenSource | Among this week's guests, Nathan J. Robinson, Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy.

Latest policy, research briefs, and expert testimony

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