Publications by Type: Book

2019
Innovation + Equality: How to Create a Future That Is More Star Trek Than Terminator
Remaking a Life: How Women Living with AIDS Confront Inequality
Watkins-Hayes, Celeste. 2019. Remaking a Life: How Women Living with AIDS Confront Inequality. University of California Press.
Social Poverty: Low-Income Parents and the Struggle for Family and Community Ties
Halpern-Meekin, Sarah. 2019. Social Poverty: Low-Income Parents and the Struggle for Family and Community Ties. New York University Press.
In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake American High Schools
Mehta, Jal, and Sarah Fine. 2019. In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake American High Schools. Harvard University Press.
The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges are Failing Disadvantaged Students
Jack, Anthony Abraham. 2019. The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges are Failing Disadvantaged Students. Harvard University Press.
State Capture: How Conservative Activists, Big Businesses, and Wealthy Donors Reshaped the American States — and the Nation
On the Outside: Prisoner Reentry and Reintegration
Harding, David J., Jeffrey D. Morenoff, and Jessica J.B. Wyse. 2019. On the Outside: Prisoner Reentry and Reintegration. University of Chicago Press.
2018
The Turnout Gap: Race, Ethnicity, and Political Inequality in Diversifying America
Améliorer les appariements sur le marché du travail, by Alexandra Roulet
Roulet, Alexandra. 2018. Améliorer les appariements sur le marché du travail. Les Presses de Sciences Po.
Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Are Changing Our World
Leigh, Andrew. 2018. Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Are Changing Our World. Yale University Press.
Navigation by Judgment: Why and When Top-down Management of Foreign Aid Doesn’t Work
Education in a New Society, edited by Jal Mehta and Scott Davies
Mehta, Jal, and Scott Davies, ed. 2018. Education in a New Society: Renewing the Sociology of Education. University of Chicago Press.
The Increasingly United States: How and Why American Political Behavior Nationalized
Politics at Work, by Alexander Hertel-Fernandez
Hertel-Fernandez, Alexander. 2018. Politics at Work: How Companies Turn Their Workers into Lobbyists. Oxford University Press.
Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence

Beginning in the mid-1990s, American cities experienced an astonishing drop in violent crime. By 2014, the United States was safer than it had been in sixty years. Sociologist Patrick Sharkey gathered data from across the country to understand why this happened, and how it changed the nature of urban inequality. He shows that the decline of violence is one of the most important public health breakthroughs of the past several decades, that it has made schools safer places to learn and increased the chances of poor children rising into the middle class. Yet there have been costs, in the abuses and high incarceration rates generated by aggressive policing.

Sharkey puts forth an entirely new approach to confronting violence and urban poverty. At a time when inequality, complacency, and conflict all threaten a new rise in violent crime, and the old methods of policing are unacceptable, the ideas in this book are indispensable.

2017
Deadly Justice: A Statistical Portrait of the Death Penalty
Baumgartner, Frank, Marty Davidson, Kaneesha R. Johnson, Arvind Krishnamurthy, and Colin Wilson. 2017. Deadly Justice: A Statistical Portrait of the Death Penalty. Oxford University Press.
The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life
Jiménez, Tomás R. 2017. The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 296. Abstract

The immigration patterns of the last three decades have profoundly changed nearly every aspect of life in the United States. What do those changes mean for the most established Americans—those whose families have been in the country for multiple generations?
 
The Other Side of Assimilation shows that assimilation is not a one-way street. Jiménez explains how established Americans undergo their own assimilation in response to profound immigration-driven ethnic, racial, political, economic, and cultural shifts. Drawing on interviews with a race and class spectrum of established Americans in three different Silicon Valley cities, The Other Side of Assimilation illuminates how established Americans make sense of their experiences in immigrant-rich environments, in work, school, public interactions, romantic life, and leisure activities. With lucid prose, Jiménez reveals how immigration not only changes the American cityscape but also reshapes the United States by altering the outlooks and identities of its most established citizens. 

 

(Re)Generating Inclusive Cities: Poverty and Planning in Urban North America
Zuberi, Dan, and Ariel Judith Taylor. 2017. (Re)Generating Inclusive Cities: Poverty and Planning in Urban North America. Routledge, 144. Abstract

As suburban expansion declines, cities have become essential economic, cultural and social hubs of global connectivity. This book is about urban revitalization across North America, in cities including San Francisco, Toronto, Boston, Vancouver, New York and Seattle. Infrastructure projects including the High Line and Big Dig are explored alongside urban neighborhood creation and regeneration projects such as Hunters Point in San Francisco and Regent Park in Toronto. Today, these urban regeneration projects have evolved in the context of unprecedented neoliberal public policy and soaring real estate prices. Consequently, they make a complex contribution to urban inequality and poverty trends in many of these cities, including the suburbanization of immigrant settlement and rising inequality. 

(Re)Generating Inclusive Cities wrestles with challenging but important questions of urban planning, including who benefits and who loses with these urban regeneration schemes, and what policy tools can be used to mitigate harm? We propose a new way forward for understanding and promoting better urban design practices in order to build more socially just and inclusive cities and to ultimately improve the quality of urban life for all.

Someone To Talk To
Small, Mario Luis. 2017. Someone To Talk To. Oxford University Press, 288. Abstract

When people are facing difficulties, they often feel the need for a confidant-a person to vent to or a sympathetic ear with whom to talk things through. How do they decide on whom to rely? In theory, the answer seems obvious: if the matter is personal, they will turn to a spouse, a family member, or someone close. In practice, what people actually do often belies these expectations. 

In Someone To Talk To, Mario L. Small follows a group of graduate students as they cope with stress, overwork, self-doubt, failure, relationships, children, health care, and poverty. He unravels how they decide whom to turn to for support. And he then confirms his findings based on representative national data on adult Americans. 

Small shows that rather than consistently rely on their "strong ties," Americans often take pains to avoid close friends and family, as these relationships are both complex and fraught with expectations. In contrast, they often confide in "weak ties," as the need for understanding or empathy trumps their fear of misplaced trust. In fact, people may find themselves confiding in acquaintances and even strangers unexpectedly, without having reflected on the consequences. 

Someone To Talk To reveals the often counter-intuitive nature of social support, helping us understand questions as varied as why a doctor may hide her depression from friends, how a teacher may come out of the closet unintentionally, why people may willingly share with others their struggle to pay the rent, and why even competitors can be among a person's best confidants.

Amid a growing wave of big data and large-scale network analysis, Small returns to the basic questions of who we connect with, how, and why, upending decades of conventional wisdom on how we should think about and analyze social networks.

Read My Lips: Why Americans Are Proud to Pay Taxes
Williamson, Vanessa S. 2017. Read My Lips: Why Americans Are Proud to Pay Taxes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 304. Abstract

Conventional wisdom holds that Americans hate taxes. But the conventional wisdom is wrong. Bringing together national survey data with in-depth interviews, Read My Lips presents a surprising picture of tax attitudes in the United States. Vanessa Williamson demonstrates that Americans view taxpaying as a civic responsibility and a moral obligation. But they worry that others are shirking their duties, in part because the experience of taxpaying misleads Americans about who pays taxes and how much. Perceived "loopholes" convince many income tax filers that a flat tax might actually raise taxes on the rich, and the relative invisibility of the sales and payroll taxes encourages many to underestimate the sizable tax contributions made by poor and working people.

Americans see being a taxpayer as a role worthy of pride and respect, a sign that one is a contributing member of the community and the nation. For this reason, the belief that many Americans are not paying their share is deeply corrosive to the social fabric. The widespread misperception that immigrants, the poor, and working-class families pay little or no taxes substantially reduces public support for progressive spending programs and undercuts the political standing of low-income people. At the same time, the belief that the wealthy pay less than their share diminishes confidence that the political process represents most people.

Upending the idea of Americans as knee-jerk opponents of taxes, Read My Lips examines American taxpaying as an act of political faith. Ironically, the depth of the American civic commitment to taxpaying makes the failures of the tax system, perceived and real, especially potent frustrations.

 

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