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Latest Inequality & Social Policy In the News

The Ezra Klein Show

Ta-Nehisi Coates: “There’s not gonna be a happy ending to this story”

December 14, 2016

The Ezra Klein Show | Interview with author Ta-Nehisi Coates, who discusses his cover article in the current issue of the Atlantic based on hours of interviews with President Obama about the role race played in Obama’s upbringing, his presidency, and the 2016 campaign. Asked about "a few of the data points" that have influenced his thinking, Coates cites work of Harvard sociologists Robert Sampson on neighborhoods and Devah Pager on discrimination in the labor market.

The ways Boston changed

The ways Boston changed

December 13, 2016

Harvard Gazette | Harvard sociology course,“Reinventing (and Reimagining) Boston: The Changing American City,” is featured. Taught by Robert Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, and David Luberoff, a lecturer on sociology and Senior Associate Director of the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard.

My President Was Black

My President Was Black

December 13, 2016

The Atlantic | Cover article by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Jan-Feb 2017 print issue) cites research by Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. '09) and Patrick Sharkey (Ph.D. '07). Judith Scott-Clayton, now Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, found that "black graduates [hold] nearly $53,000 in student loan debt four years after graduation—almost twice as much as their white counterparts, and that "black college graduates are still substantially more likely to default on their debt within four years of graduation (7.6 percent versus 2.4 percent of white graduates)." Learn more about this research, which Scott-Clayton wrote about for the Brookings Institution "Evidence Speaks" series in October 2016. 

Coates also cites Patrick Sharkey, Professor of Sociology at New York University, whose book, Stuck in Place (University of Chicago Press, 2013), showed that black families making $100,000 a year or more live in more-disadvantaged neighborhoods than white families making less than $30,000.

How to Jump Start the American Dream

How to Jump Start the American Dream

December 12, 2016

The Atlantic—CityLab | The odds that kids will do better than their parents have plummeted. One possible fix: Learn from the neighborhoods in which income mobility is still thriving. Features new study and earlier research by economists Raj Chetty of Stanford and Nathaniel Hendren of Harvard from their Equality of Opportunity project. 

The Mistakes We Make When Giving to Charity

The Mistakes We Make When Giving to Charity

December 11, 2016

Wall Street Journal | Our minds play tricks on us, limiting the effectiveness of our efforts. Cites study in Science by Michael I. Norton, Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, and collaborators Elizabeth W. Dunn and Laura B. Aknin, both of University of British Columbia, which showed that spending money on others promotes happiness.
​​​​​​​View the research

Severe Inequality Is Incompatible with the American Dream

Severe Inequality Is Incompatible with the American Dream

December 10, 2016

The Atlantic | Features Robert Manduca, Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy, a co-author of the study discussed in this article. The findings come from a new paper out of the Equality of Opportunity project, led by economists Raj Chetty of Stanford and Nathaniel Hendren of Harvard.
View the research

The Persistent Inequality of Neighborhoods

The Persistent Inequality of Neighborhoods

December 9, 2016

The Atlantic—CityLab | Delves into a major recent study by Robert J. Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, which examines the spatial foundations of persistent inequality. The study referenced in the article is part of the volume Economic Mobility, a new publication released by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
View the research

Giving people a free monthly stipend actually leads them to drink and smoke less

Giving people a free monthly stipend actually leads them to drink and smoke less

December 9, 2016

Business Insider | Do cash transfers to the poor lead to increased purchase of "temptation goods"? New study by David Evans (Ph.D. '05), a senior economist at the World Bank, and Anna Popova of Stanford University examines the evidence from Africa, Asia, and Latin America and concludes no. Their work is forthcoming the in the journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.
View the research

Inequality Is Killing The American Dream

Inequality Is Killing The American Dream

December 8, 2016

FiveThirtyEight | Explores the role of inequality in a new study of economic mobility by Raj Chetty, David Grusky, Maximilian Hell, Nathaniel Hendren (Assistant Professor of Economics, Harvard), Robert Manduca (Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy, Harvard), and Jimmy Narang.

"But inequality was a much bigger driver [than economic growth]. The researchers analyzed a scenario in which growth followed its real-world path, but that growth was distributed more equally. In that scenario, the rate of mobility would rise to 80 percent, wiping out more than two-thirds of the 40-year decline.

Ultimately, Hendren said, restoring mobility will require both. 'You need growth, and you need it to be broad-based,' Hendren said."

American Dream collapsing for young adults, study says, as odds plunge that children will earn more than their parents

American Dream collapsing for young adults, study says, as odds plunge that children will earn more than their parents

December 8, 2016

Washington Post | Coverage of new study by Raj Chetty, David Grusky, Maximilian Hell, Nathaniel Hendren (Assistant Professor of Economics, Harvard), Robert Manduca (Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy, Harvard), and Jimmy Narang.

"Previously, Chetty's team studied a different measure of mobility: the ability of children to move up or down America's income ladder as they grow up, when compared to other Americans. The new research attempts, for the first time, to quantify so-called "absolute mobility," which people often associate with the American Dream: the odds of a child earning more as an adult than his or her parents earned at the same age.

"The researchers say rising concentration of income among the richest Americans explains 70 percent of what has been a steady decline in absolute mobility from the baby boom generation to millennials, while a slowdown in economic growth explains just 30 percent...

"If you don’t have that kind of widespread economic growth across the income distribution, it’s tough to grow up and earn more than your parents,” Hendren said. “This is a distinct reason to focus on inequality."

The American Dream, Quantified at Last

The American Dream, Quantified at Last

December 8, 2016

The New York Times | Nathaniel Hendren, Assistant Professor of Economics, and Robert Manduca, Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy, are among a team of researchers from Stanford, Harvard, and Berkeley who have released an important new study of economic mobility in the U.S., which finds that only half of Americans in their thirties earn more than their parents did at the same age. A few decades ago, nearly all did.

The team was led by economist Raj Chetty of Stanford and Nathaniel Hendren of Harvard, principal investigators for the Equality of Opportunity project, in collaboration with sociologist David Grusky of Stanford. The study incorporates results from an independent working paper by Inequality & Social Policy doctoral fellow Robert Manduca titled “Opportunity No More: Declining Absolute Mobility in the United States, 1940-2010.”
View the new study (PDF)
Learn more: Equality of Opportunity project

A Better Theory to Explain Financial Bubbles

A Better Theory to Explain Financial Bubbles

December 8, 2016

Bloomberg View | Discusses recent paper by Edward L. Glaeser and Charles G. Nathanson, "An Extrapolative Model of House-Price Dynamics," forthcoming in the Journal of Financial Economics. Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard. Nathanson is Assistant Professor of Finance at the Kellogg School of Management.
​​​​​​​View the research... Read more about A Better Theory to Explain Financial Bubbles

A Bigger Economic Pie, but a Smaller Slice for Half of the U.S.

A Bigger Economic Pie, but a Smaller Slice for Half of the U.S.

December 6, 2016

The New York Times | Lawrence Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics, comments on new study on U.S. economic inequality by Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. Also cited, the work of Claudia Goldin, Henry Lee Professor of Economics, and Katz on the race between education and technology as a driver of inequality.

Latest awards

Christopher Winship named an Edmond J. Safra Fellow-in-Residence

Christopher Winship named an Edmond J. Safra Fellow-in-Residence

March 31, 2016

Awardee | Christopher Winship, Diker-Tishman Professor of Sociology, has been selected an Edmond J. Safra Fellow-in-Residence for the 2016-17 academic year. During the fellowship year, Winship will be working on an evaluation of community-police relations in Boston.

Anthony Jack recognized for his contributions to the black community at Harvard College

Anthony Jack recognized for his contributions to the black community at Harvard College

March 25, 2016

Awardee | Anthony Abraham Jack (Ph.D. candidate in Sociology) is the recipient of the Association of Black Harvard Women (ABHW) Tribute to Black Men Faculty Award in recognition of his "exceptional and lasting contributions to the black community at Harvard College." Jack will be a Junior Fellow in Harvard Society of Fellows (2016-2019) and then joins the Harvard faculty (beginning 2019) as Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Shutzer Assistant Professor with the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

AERA Early Career Award in Educational Policy

AERA Early Career Award in Educational Policy

March 22, 2016

Awardee | Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. in Public Policy '09), Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, is the 2016 recipient of the American Educational Research Association Early Career Award in Educational Policy. Scott-Clayton studies labor economics and higher education policy, with a focus on financial aid, student employment, and programmatic barriers to college persistence and completion. Her work examining the adverse consequences of complexity in the federal student aid application process has contributed to national policy debates about financial aid simplification.

AEFP Jean Flanigan Outstanding Dissertation Award 2016: Sarah Cohodes

AEFP Jean Flanigan Outstanding Dissertation Award 2016: Sarah Cohodes

March 17, 2016

Awardee | Sarah Cohodes (Ph.D. in Public Policy, '15) is a recipient of the 2016 Jean Flanigan Outstanding Dissertation Award conferred by the Association of Education Finance and Policy for exemplary dissertation research in education finance and policy. Cohodes is now Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy at Teachers College, Columbia University. 

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

March 17, 2016

Pacific Standard | Alex Hertel-Fernandez (Ph.D. candidate in Government & Social Policy) has been selected one of 'Thirty under 30' top young thinkers who are making an impact on the social, political, and economic issues that will shape the nation's future.  Hertel-Fernandez joins the Columbia University faculty as Assistant Professor in the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA).

Paul Peterson Receives Prize for Best Academic Paper on School Choice and Reform

Paul Peterson Receives Prize for Best Academic Paper on School Choice and Reform

March 15, 2016

Awardee | Paul E. Peterson, Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard Kennedy School, and Matthew M. Chingos, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, have been selected as winners of the 2016 Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP) Prize for their paper “Experimentally estimated impacts of school vouchers on college enrollment and degree attainment,” named best academic paper on school choice and reform.

Herbert H. Lehman Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in New York History

Herbert H. Lehman Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in New York History

March 15, 2016

Awardee | Michael Javen Fortner (Ph.D. in Government & Social Policy '10) has been awarded the 2016 Herbert H. Lehman Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in New York History by the New York Academy of History for his book, Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment, published by Harvard University Press in 2015. Fortner is Assistant Professor and Academic Director of Urban Studies at the CUNY School of Professional Studies, Murphy Institute.

Upjohn Institute 2016 Early Career Research Award

Upjohn Institute 2016 Early Career Research Award

March 14, 2016

Awardee | John Horton (Ph.D. in Public Policy '11), Assistant Professor in the Stern School of Business, New York University, is the recipient of an Early Career Research Award from the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. Horton will investigate the effect of demand shocks on human capital acquisition strategies.

Nathan Hendren named a 2016 Sloan Research Fellow

Nathan Hendren named a 2016 Sloan Research Fellow

February 23, 2016

Awardee | Nathaniel Hendren, Assistant Professor of Economics, is one of 126 early-career scientists and scholars selected for the prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship, which recognizes the next generation of leaders in eight scientific fields. Harvard colleague Melissa Dell, also an Assistant Professor of Economics, was likewise named a 2016 Sloan Research Fellow. Read the press release.

Roland Fryer: 2015 John Bates Clark Medalist

Roland Fryer: 2015 John Bates Clark Medalist

February 3, 2016

Journal of Economic Perspectives | By Lawrence F. Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics: "Roland Fryer is an extraordinary applied microeconomist whose research output related to racial inequality, the US racial achievement gap, and the design and evaluation of educational policies make him a worthy recipient of the 2015 John Bates Clark Medal. I will divide this survey of Roland's research into five categories..."

ESSA Accountability Design Competition: The Contenders

ESSA Accountability Design Competition: The Contenders

January 28, 2016

Thomas B. Fordham Institute | Ronald F. Ferguson of the Harvard Kennedy School is one of ten finalists in the Fordham Institute's ESSA Accountability Design Competition. Under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), states now face the challenge of creating school accountability systems that can vastly improve upon the model required by No Child Left Behind. To help spur creative thinking about how they might do so, and to inform the Department of Education as it develops its ESSA regulations, the Fordham Institute is sponsoring this competition. The ten finalists will pitch their work on the Fordham stage to a live audience and a panel of judges on February 2.

The 2016 Education Scholar Public Influence Rankings: Top Tens

The 2016 Education Scholar Public Influence Rankings: Top Tens

January 7, 2016

Education Week | Inequality & Social Policy faculty and alumni are well-represented on this year's Education Week list of 200 most influential education scholars, university-based scholars "who are doing the most to influence education policy and practice." Of special note, alumni hold four of the top five spots on the junior faculty list, including Martin West, David Deming, and Jal Mehta (Harvard), and Judith Scott-Clayton (Columbia TC).

John Bates Clark Medal Award Ceremony [video]

John Bates Clark Medal Award Ceremony [video]

January 4, 2016

Awardee | Watch as Roland Fryer, Henry Lee Professor of Economics, receives the American Economic Association's  John Bates Clark Medal. In his remarks, Fryer reflects on "the true owners who have paved the way for all of us who use the tools of economics not just to calculate the odds for poor people, but to change the odds." [begins at 15:45 mark]

2015-2016 New Scholar Grant Winners

2015-2016 New Scholar Grant Winners

December 21, 2015

Awardee| Deirdre Bloome (Ph.D. '14, now University of Michigan) is one of seven New Scholar grant recipients selected by Stanford's Center on Poverty and Inequality. Bloome will investigate (1) to what extent intragenerational and intergenerational income mobility contribute to lifetime income inequality, (2) how these contributions have changed across recent birth cohorts, and (3) whether these differ across people from low- and high-income backgrounds—with an eye to understanding "how income mobility over the life course relates to income inequality between people."

Finalists for 2016 William T. Grant Scholars Program Awards

Finalists for 2016 William T. Grant Scholars Program Awards

December 21, 2015

William T. Grant Foundation | Faculty member Matthew Desmond is one of ten finalists for the William T. Grant Foundation Scholars program, which supports early career researchers in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. Four to six Scholars will be selected in March 2016 for these five-year research awards.

Anthony Abraham Jack named to Harvard Society of Fellows

Anthony Abraham Jack named to Harvard Society of Fellows

December 14, 2015

Congratulations to Anthony Abraham Jack (Ph.D. candidate in Sociology), who has been selected to join the Harvard Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow in the 2016-19 cohort. The Harvard  Society of Fellows recognizes the ‘highest caliber of intellectual achievement’ from any field of study, awarding three-year postdoctoral fellowships to twelve new Junior Fellows each year. Learn more about Anthony Jack at his homepage▶

Ariel White named a Harvard Horizons Scholar

Ariel White named a Harvard Horizons Scholar

December 10, 2015

Awardee | Ariel R. White (Ph.D. candidate in Government) has been selected one of eight Harvard Horizons Scholars for 2016—"PhD students whose ideas, innovations, and insights have the potential to reshape their disciplines." Ariel will present her research, Voter Behavior in the Shadow of Punitive Policies, at a university-wide symposium to be held in Sanders Theater on April 5, 2016. Read more about her work ►

'Our Kids' selected for Books of the Year 2015

'Our Kids' selected for Books of the Year 2015

December 3, 2015

The Economist | Robert Putnam's, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, described as "thoughtful and persuasive", has been selected by The Economist as one of the best books of 2015.  Also making the list, Inequality: What Can Be Done?, by Anthony Atkinson (University of Oxford).

Latest commentary and analysis

Yes, signing those petitions makes a difference — even if they don’t change Trump’s mind

Yes, signing those petitions makes a difference — even if they don’t change Trump’s mind

February 3, 2017

Washington Post | By Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government and Director of the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Learn more about his research project on The Petition and Republican Government:
​​​​​​​View project website... Read more about Yes, signing those petitions makes a difference — even if they don’t change Trump’s mind

Foreign Policy

It's Time to Think for Yourself on Free Trade

January 27, 2017

Foreign Policy | By Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy. What economists and populists both get wrong about the international economy.

Big money, dark politics

Does Big Money Make for Dark Politics?

January 27, 2017

WGBH Innovation Hub | A conversation with Harvard political scientist Theda Skocpol, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology, and Jane Mayer, journalist and author of Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right.

LSE Inequalities logo

The Piketty Opportunity

January 26, 2017

LSE International Inequalities Institute (III) | This event marked the publication of The Contradictions of Capital in the Twenty-First Century, a volume of essays that builds upon the renewed interest in wealth and inequality stimulated by the work of Thomas Piketty. Editors and authors Patricia Hudson, Avner Offer and Keith Tribe were joined by discussants Torben Iversen (Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and an LSE Centennial Professor) and Tasha Fairfield (LSE International Development), and associates of the LSE III to discuss inequality in an international context. Chaired by Mike Savage, Co-director of the International Inequalities Institute and Professor of Sociology at LSE.

In related work, Iversen is co-author (joint with Harvard's James Alt) of "Inequality, Labor Market Segmentation, and Preferences for Redistribution," now out in the January 2017 issue of the  American Journal of Political Science.
View the research

The Research on Charter Schools: An Introduction

The Research on Charter Schools: An Introduction

January 25, 2017

Education Next  | Interview with Joshua S. Goodman and Paul E. Peterson. Joshua Goodman is Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Paul Peterson is the Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government and director of the Kennedy School’s Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG). Interview conducted by Doug Gavel of the Harvard Kennedy School.

Here's who should really pay for Trump's new roads and bridges

Here's who should really pay for Trump's new roads and bridges

January 24, 2017

CNBC | By Edward L. Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics. "If President Trump wants to seriously improve American infrastructure spending," writes Glaeser, "he should champion a new federalism for transportation, in which infrastructure is funded by states, localities and especially the users themselves."

Here’s What Works for Teacher Accountability

Here’s What Works for Teacher Accountability

January 24, 2017

Education Week | Op-ed by Brian Gill and Jennifer Lerner draws on the implications of behavioral science for accountability in schools. Gill is a senior fellow at Mathmatical Policy Research. Lerner is a  professor within the Management, Leadership, and Decision Science Area at the Harvard Kennedy School, and co-founder of the Harvard Decision Science Laboratory. The research on which this essay is based appeared in the fall 2016 issue of the journall Behavioral Science and Policy.
View the research

Inaugural Freedom Ball

Get ready for a four-year-long pageant

January 21, 2017

Washington Post | By Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.

Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Lest We Forget

January 20, 2017

Moyers & Company | Four historians and political scientists "dissect the big lie Trump rode to power: the Birther lie." Featuring Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Neil Painter (Princeton University); Christopher Lebron (Yale University); and Philip Klinkner (Hamilton College). [Video + transcript]

Latest policy, research briefs, and expert testimony

Residential Mobility by Whites Maintains Segregation Despite Recent Changes

Residential Mobility by Whites Maintains Segregation Despite Recent Changes

December 21, 2016

NYU Furman Center | By Jackelyn Hwang (Ph.D. '15), essay for the NYU Furman Center discussion series "The Dream Revisited." Hwang is postdoctoral research fellow at Princeton University, and in fall 2017 will join the Stanford University faculty as Assistant Professor of Sociology.

Economic Report of the President 2017

Economic Report of the President 2017

December 15, 2016

Reducing inequality, reforming the health care system, investing in higher education, strengthening the financial system, and addressing climate change are the focus of this year's Economic Report of the President.

Draws on research by Inequality & Social Policy affiliates Amitabh Chandra, Sarah Cohodes (Ph.D. '15), David Deming (Ph.D. '10 and faculty), Will Dobbie (Ph.D. '13), Roland Fryer, Claudia Goldin, Joshua Goodman, Nathaniel Hendren, Thomas Kane, Lawrence Katz, Adam Looney (Ph.D. '04), Brigitte Madrian, Sendhil Mullainathan, Jonah Rockoff (Ph.D. '04), and Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. '09).

Washington Center for Equitable Growth

The fading American dream: trends in absolute income mobility since 1940

December 8, 2016

Washington Center for Equitable Growth | By Raj Chetty, David Grusky, Maximilian Hell, Nathaniel Hendren, Robert Manduca, and Jimmy Narang.

A summary of the authors' findings from a newly-released paper by a team of researchers from Stanford, Harvard, and UC Berkeley. Harvard Inequality & Social Policy affiliates are Nathaniel Hendren, Assistant Professor of Economics, and Robert Manduca, Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy. Learn more: The Equality of Opportunity Project 

A principled federal role in PreK-12 education

A principled federal role in PreK-12 education

December 7, 2016

Brookings Institution | By Douglas N. Harris, Helen F. Ladd, Marshall S. Smith, and Martin R. West. A set of principles to guide the federal role in education policy from a bipartisan group of scholars and policy experts. Martin West (Ph.D. '06) is an associate professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

High-Stakes Student Testing has Mixed Results in Texas Schools

High-Stakes Student Testing has Mixed Results in Texas Schools

December 1, 2016

Harvard Kennedy School | Discusses findings of new study forthcoming in the December issue of The Review of Economics and Statistics by David J. Deming (Ph.D. '10), Professor of Education and Economics, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Sarah Cohodes (Ph.D. '15), Assistant Professor of Education an Public Policy, Teachers College, Columbia University; Jennifer Jennings of New York University; and Christopher Jencks, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy, Emeritus, Harvard Kennedy School.... Read more about High-Stakes Student Testing has Mixed Results in Texas Schools

After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality

After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality

November 15, 2016

 

Harvard University Press | Ellora Derenoncourt, Ph.D. candidate in Economics, is a contributor to After Piketty, forthcoming from Harvard University Press in April 2017. Edited by Heather Boushey, J. Bradford DeLong, and Marshall Steinbaum, the 640-page volume brings together published reviews by Nobel laureates Paul Krugman and Robert Solow and newly-commissioned essays by Suresh Naidu, Laura Tyson, Michael Spence, Heather Boushey, Branko Milanovic, and others. Emmanuel Saez lays out an agenda for future research on inequality, while a variety of essays examine the book's implications for the social sciences more broadly. Piketty replies in a substantial concluding chapter.

Derenoncourt's chapter explores the historical and institutional origins of the wealth and income inequality documented in Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century. Drawing on the framework introduced by Daron Acemoglu, Simon Johnson, and James Robinson of extractive and inclusive institutions, Derenoncourt demonstrates how these institutions influence the distribution of economic outcomes in different countries and regions historically. In particular, she explores these questions in the context of slavery in the US South and European colonization in Africa and the Americas.

Learn more about her work:
Ellora Derenoncourt: Ph.D. fellow page ▶... Read more about After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality

Chart of the week: Do high taxes motivate star inventors to relocate?

Chart of the week: Do high taxes motivate star inventors to relocate?

November 4, 2016

American Economics Association | Is tax flight by the rich mostly a myth or a serious concern? Discusses new study co-authored by Stefanie Stantcheva, Assistant Professor of Economics, which appears in the October issue of the American Economic Review. The research is co-authored by Ufuk Akcigit, University of Chicago, and Salomé Baslandze, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance. 
View AER article (complimentary access)

Research highlight: Are hospitals more like other businesses than we thought?

Research highlight: Are hospitals more like other businesses than we thought?

November 2, 2016

American Economics Association | Delves into new article by Harvard's Amitabh Chandra (Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy), Amy Finkelstein (MIT), Adam Sacarny (Columbia University), and Chad Syverson (Chicago Booth).

"A study published in the August issue of American Economic Review found that hospitals – long thought to be economic islands apart from typical market pressures – are shaped by consumer-driven forces like in other industries. The findings challenge long-held beliefs about health care “exceptionalism” and raise questions for policymakers as they consider reforms to the $3 trillion U.S. health care sector."
View the AER article (complimentary access)

The Importance of Middle Skill Jobs

The Importance of Middle Skill Jobs

October 25, 2016

National Academy of Sciences—Issues in Science and Technology | By Alicia Sasser Modestino (Ph.D. '01). Middle-skill jobs are key for the nation and its workforce. Here is where things stand today and projections for future improvements. 

Alicia Sasser Modestino is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Economics at Northeastern University, and Associate Director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy.

6 charts showing race gaps within the American middle class

6 charts showing race gaps within the American middle class

October 21, 2016

Brookings Institution | Latest Social Mobility Memo by Richard V. Reeves and Dana Bowen Matthew of the Brookings Institution features findings of new study by Judith-Scott Clayton (Ph.D. '09), Associate Professor of Education and Economics, Teachers College, Columbia University, and Jing-Li, also of Columbia University, revealing large black-white disparities in student loan debt, which more than triples after graduation.

Invention, place, and economic inclusion

Invention, place, and economic inclusion

October 20, 2016

Brookings Institution | Delves into research by Inequality fellow Alex Bell (Ph.D. candidate in Economics), Raj Chetty (Stanford University), Xavier Jaravel (now a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford), and John Van Reenen (LSE and MIT) showing that "children of low-income parents are much less likely to become inventors than their higher-income counterparts (as are minorities and women)." Their research explores the sources of differences, and "establishes the importance of 'innovation exposure effects' during childhood," both geographic and parental.
View the research

Black-white disparity in student loan debt more than triples after graduation

Black-white disparity in student loan debt more than triples after graduation

October 20, 2016

Brookings Institution | By Judith Scott Clayton (Ph.D. '09), Associate Professor of Economics and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, and Jing Li, Research Associate, Teachers College: "While previous work has documented racial disparities in student borrowing, delinquencies, and defaults, in this report we provide new evidence that racial gaps in total debt are far larger than even recent reports have recognized, far larger now than in the past, and correlated with troubling trends in the economy and in the for-profit sector. We conclude with a discussion of policy implications."

Recommendations for Federal Budget Policy

Recommendations for Federal Budget Policy

October 7, 2016

Brookings Institution | By Douglas W Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School. This brief is part of "Election 2016 and America’s Future." a Brookings-wide initiative in which Brookings scholars have identified the biggest issues facing the country this election season and are providing individual ideas for how to address them. Elmendorf was a visiting fellow with Brookings until he became Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School in January 2016.

Seven Facts on Noncognitive Skills from Education to the Labor Market

Seven Facts on Noncognitive Skills from Education to the Labor Market

October 4, 2016

The Hamilton Project | New policy brief  by Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach and colleagues draws from research by Harvard faculty member David Deming, "The Growing Importance of Social Skills in the Labor Market." Deming (Ph.D. '10), Professor of Education and Economics at Harvard Graduate School of Education, first presented this work in the Inequality & Social Policy Seminar Series in fall 2015.
View the latest version of Deming's paper (Aug 2016).... Read more about Seven Facts on Noncognitive Skills from Education to the Labor Market

Housing Development Toolkit

Housing Development Toolkit

September 26, 2016

The White House | The Obama administration issued a policy brief that takes aim at accumulated barriers to housing development, zoning and other land-use regulations that the administration argues are jeopardizing housing affordability, increasing income inequality by reducing access to high-wage labor  markets, and stifling economic growth. The report cites Sociology faculty member Matthew Desmond's Evicted, noting the lasting trauma that extreme rent burdens and housing insecurity can pose for families, and draws extensively on research by Peter Ganong and Daniel Shoag (Ph.D. '11 and HKS faculty), Edward Glaeser (Economics), and Raven (Saks) Malloy (Ph.D. '05), now section chief with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, on the rise and consequences of land-use regulations.