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Latest Inequality & Social Policy In the News

Carrie Conaway

Carrie Conaway elected president of AEFP

March 17, 2017

Association for Education Finance and Policy | Alumna Carrie Conaway was elected president of AEFP at its 42nd annual conference in Washington, D.C. Conaway is the chief strategy and research officer for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. She was recently appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Board for Education Sciences.

Jared Schachner

Minority Neighborhoods at the Bottom of L.A.'s Economic Ladder Tend to Stay There

March 17, 2017

L.A. Weekly | Jared Schachner, Ph.D. student in Sociology & Social Policy, discusses findings of a new study co-authored with Harvard's Robert J. Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, and Robert D. Mare of UCLA. Their article, "Urban Income Inequality and the Great Recession in Sunbelt Form," appears in a new RSF Journal issue on "Spatial Foundations of Inequality."
View the research

Financial aid complexity

Navigating Our Shameful, Maddeningly Complex Student Aid System

March 17, 2017

The New York Times | Quotes and cites research by Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. '09), Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Columbia University Teachers College, and Susan Dynarski (University of Michigan) showing that lower-income students suffer disproportionately from inefficient complexity in financial aid.
View the research

What if Sociologists Had as Much Influence as Economists?

What if Sociologists Had as Much Influence as Economists?

March 17, 2017

The New York Times | "Another academic discipline may not have the ear of presidents but may actually do a better job of explaining what has gone wrong in large swaths of the United States and other advanced nations in recent years," argues Economic View columnist Neil Irwin. Features Harvard sociologist Michèle Lamont and highlights the lessons about poverty that Matthew Desmond's Evicted has illuminated. 

Science

Three Harvard Experts Explain How Economics Can Shape Precision Medicines

March 16, 2017

Harvard Business School | Discusses a new article published in Science by Assistant Professor Ariel D. Stern (Ph.D. '14) of Harvard Business School, Associate Professor Brian M. Alexander of Harvard Medical School, and Amitabh Chandra, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard Kennedy School.
View the article in Science

Read more about Three Harvard Experts Explain How Economics Can Shape Precision Medicines
The Increasing Significance of the Decline of Men

The Increasing Significance of the Decline of Men

March 16, 2017

The New York Times | Women have fared better than men in adapting to a changing labor market. Cites David Deming (Ph.D.'10), Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and his work on the growing importance of social skills in the labor market. Also quoted: Richard Freeman, Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics.
View the research

No, The CBO Was Not 'Way, Way Off' On Scoring Obamacare

No, The CBO Was Not 'Way, Way Off' On Scoring Obamacare

March 14, 2017

TPM: Talking Points Memo | Harvard Kennedy School Dean Douglas Elmendor and other budget experts assess what the CBO got right and what it got wrong in its 2010 projections for the Affordable Care Act. Elmendorf served as director of the Congressional Budget Office from January 2009 to March 2015.

The Congressional Budget Office, explained

The Congressional Budget Office, explained

March 13, 2017

Vox | CBO’s score of Republicans’ health plan is out, and it looks grim. Here’s why the agency has such influence, explains Vox. Douglas Elmendorf, director of the Congressional Budget Office from 2009 to 2015 and now Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School, is among those interviewed.

Crime and the Adolescent Brain

Crime and the Adolescent Brain

March 11, 2017

The New York Times | Editorial cites "a 2016 report by the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, [which] found that raising the age for adult prosecution produced sharp reductions in arrests, court caseloads and incarceration costs. Sixteen-year-olds who are tried as juveniles are less likely to be rearrested than those tried as adults. And arrests for people under 18 dropped by an astonishing 68 percent while the crime rate has continued to decline."

Lael Chester (Research Fellow) and Vincent Schiraldi (Senior Research Fellow) of the Malcolm Wiener Center's Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management authored the report.

Tips from history in an age of Trump, protests

Tips from history in an age of Trump, protests

March 10, 2017

Boston Globe | Four books with lessons for today's protestors, including Daniel Schlozman's  When Movements Anchor Parties: Electoral Alignments in American History (Princeton University Press, 2015), winner of the 2016 Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the ASA's Collective Behavior and Social Movements Section. Schlozman (Ph.D. 11) is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University.

Amazon logistics center

‘Superstar Firms’ May Have Shrunk Workers’ Share of Income

March 8, 2017

The New York Times | Discusses a new study by David Autor (MIT), David Dorn (University of Zurich), Lawrence Katz (Harvard), Christina Patterson (MIT), and John Van Reenen (MIT), forthcoming in American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings.

“What’s different about new superstar firms is they don’t have the cadre of middle-class jobs for nonelite workers,” said Mr. Katz, an economics professor at Harvard. “That’s very worrisome,” he said, adding that “the trend is going on in country after country.”
View the research

Government Performance Lab Awards Technical Assistance to Three States

Government Performance Lab Awards Technical Assistance to Three States

March 8, 2017

Harvard Gazette | Jeffrey Liebman, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Public Policy and cirector of the Government Performance Lab at Harvard Kennedy School, discusses new projects with state governments in California, Connecticut, and Illinois that aim to alleviate poverty, increase family stability, combat recidivism, and improve higher education.

Robots

How to Beat the Robots

March 7, 2017

The New York Times | Quoted: Lawrence Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics. Also cites research by David Deming (Ph.D. '10), "The Growing Importance of Social Skills in the Labor Market." Deming is a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Graduate School of Education.
View the research

Election 2016: How Did We Get Here and What Does it Mean?

Election 2016: How Did We Get Here and What Does it Mean?

March 2, 2017

American Historical Association—AHA Today | Recap of the American Historical Association's plenary session, "Election 2016: How Did We Get Here and What Does it Mean?," featuring Leah Wright Rigueur, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Latest awards

Hope Harvey

Hope Harvey awarded SSSP family division paper prize

June 8, 2017

Awardee | Hope Harvey, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, has been awarded the 2017 Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) Family Division Graduate Student Paper Prize for her paper, "When Mothers Can’t ‘Pay the Cost to be the Boss’: Roles and Identity within Doubled-Up Households." Read more about Hope Harvey's work at her homepage.
scholar.harvard.edu/hopeharvey

Kelley Fong awarded SSSP paper prize in educational problems

Kelley Fong awarded SSSP paper prize in educational problems

June 8, 2017
Awardee | Kelley Fong, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, has been awarded the 2017 Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) Educational Problems Graduate Student Paper Prize for her paper (co-authored with Sarah Faude of Northeastern University), "Choosing Late: Considering Late Registration in School Choice."
Kelley Fong receives ESS Candace Rogers Student Paper Award

Kelley Fong receives ESS Candace Rogers Student Paper Award

June 6, 2017
Awardee | Kelley Fong, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, is the 2017 winner of the Eastern Sociological Society's Candace Rogers Award for most outstanding paper by a graduate student. The award for her paper, "Child Welfare Reporting and Poor Mothers’ Disengagement," was presented in February at the ESS annual meeting in Philadelphia.
Abena Subira Mackall named NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellow

Abena Subira Mackall named NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellow

May 25, 2017
National Academy of Education | Abena Subira Mackall, a doctoral candidate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, has been named 2017 National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow. Abena's research explores the mechanisms underlying associations between poverty, crime, and low educational attainment through the use of in-depth interviews.
Soledad Prillaman awarded Harvard's Robert Noxon Toppan Prize for dissertation

Soledad Prillaman awarded Harvard's Robert Noxon Toppan Prize for dissertation

May 24, 2017
Awardee | Soledad Artiz Prillaman (PhD in Government, '17) is a recipient of Harvard's Robert Noxon Toppan Prize for best dissertation on a subject of political science for her doctoral dissertation, "Why Women Mobilize: Dissecting and Dismantling India's Gender Gap in Political Participation." Prillaman, who graduates this week, will spend the next two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford, before joining the faculty at Stanford University in 2019 as Assistant Professor of Political Science.  Learn more about her work at her homepage:
soledadprillaman.com
Michael Hankinson awarded Harvard's Senator Charles Sumner Prize for dissertation

Michael Hankinson awarded Harvard's Senator Charles Sumner Prize for dissertation

May 24, 2017
Awardee | Michael Hankinson (PhD in Government & Social Policy, '17) is a recipient of Harvard's Senator Charles Sumner Prize for his dissertation, "Why is Housing So Hard to Build? Four Papers on the Collection Action Problem of Spatial Proximity." Hankinson, who graduates tomorrow, will spend the coming year as a Quantitative Policy Analysis Postdoctoral Fellow in the Politics Department at Oberlin College. Learn more about his work at his homepage:
mhankinson.com
RSF

New Awards in Intergenerational Mobility in the United States

May 18, 2017

Russell Sage Foundation | The Russell Sage Foundation announced four new awards from its small grant competition in intergenerational mobility, three of which will support research by Harvard Inequality & Social Policy affiliates:

  • Ellora Derenoncourt (Harvard University)
    Did Great Migration Destinations become Mobility Traps?
    Ellora Derenoncourt is a PhD candidate in Economics.
     
  • Ryan D. Enos (Harvard University)
    Do Public Works Programs Increase Intergenerational Mobility? Evidence from the Works Progress Administration
    Ryan Enos is Associate Professor of Government.
     
  • James J. Feigenbaum (Princeton University), Maximillian Hell (Stanford University), and Robert Manduca (Harvard University)
    The American Dream in the Great Depression: Absolute Income Mobility in the United States, 1915-1940
    James Feigenbaum (Harvard PhD '16) is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Industrial Relations Section at Princeton University. In fall 2017 he will join the Boston University faculty as Assistant Professor of Economics. Maximillian Hell is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Stanford University.  Robert Manduca is a PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy at Harvard University.

Read the project abstracts

Lives in Limbo

'Lives in Limbo' is a finalist for C. Wright Mills Award

May 12, 2017
Society for the Study of Social Problems | The Society for the Study of Social Problems announced its five finalists for its 2016 C. Wright Mills Award, including Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, by Roberto G. Gonzales, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The prestigious C. Wright Mills Award recognizes the most outstanding book  that "advances social scientific understanding" on "an issue of contemporary public importance." The winner will be announced on August 12, 2017, at the annual meeting of the... Read more about 'Lives in Limbo' is a finalist for C. Wright Mills Award
'Evicted' is a finalist for C.Wright Mills Award

'Evicted' is a finalist for C.Wright Mills Award

May 12, 2017
Society for the Study of Social Problems | The Society for the Study of Social Problems announced its five finalists for its 2016 C. Wright Mills Award, including Evicted, by Matthew Desmond, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences. The prestigious C. Wright Mills Award recognizes the most outstanding book  that "advances social scientific understanding" on "an issue of contemporary public importance." The winner will be announced on August 12, 2017, at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.
RFK Human Rights

2017 Robert F. Kennedy Book Award Winner Announced

May 8, 2017

Awardee | Matthew Desmond receives 2017 top honor for Evicted, announced today by the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights. Desmond is John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard.
 

Harvard Magazine

Radcliffe Institute Announces 2017-2018 Fellows

May 4, 2017

Harvard Magazine | Devah Pager, Leah Wright Rigueur, and Alexandra Killewald are featured among the 52 fellows who will be in residence at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study for the 2017-2018 academic year. 

Devah Pager, director of the the Inequality & Social Policy program and Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, will investigate "Race, Discrimination, and the Search for Work." Leah Wright Rigueur, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, whose work focuses on race and the American political system, will be conducting research for her project “Black Men in a White House.” Sociology professor Alexandra Killewald’s project, “Tethered Lives: How the Male Breadwinner Norm Constrains Men and Women” will build off of her research, which focuses on the work-family intersection and the effects of marriage and parenting on income.
View the full list of fellows

Noam Gidron

Noam Gidron named a Princeton Niehaus Center Fellow

May 4, 2017
Awardee | Noam Gidron (PhD '16) has been selected to be a 2017-2018 fellow in the Neihaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University. Beginning in 2018, he will join the faculty of the Department of Political Science and the Joint Program in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Learn more about Noam Gidron's work:
scholar.harvard.edu/gidron
Hope Harvey

Hope Harvey named a Radcliffe Institute Graduate Student Fellow for 2017-2018

May 4, 2017

Awardee | Hope Harvey, Ph.D. candidate in Sociology & Social Policy is one of three Harvard University doctoral students selected to be a Graduate Student Fellow in the 2017-2018 class of Radcliffe Fellows at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Hope will spend the year completing her dissertation, Exploring the Impacts of Doubling Up on American Families, with a Radcliffe Institute Dissertation Completion Fellowship. Learn more about Hope's work at her...

Read more about Hope Harvey named a Radcliffe Institute Graduate Student Fellow for 2017-2018
Katerina Linos

Katerina Linos named 2017 Carnegie Fellow

April 26, 2017
Awardee | Katerina Linos (JD '06, PhD '07) is one of 35 recipients of the 2017 Andrew Carnegie fellowship, awarded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for the advancement of research in the social sciences and humanities. Linos is Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. Project title: Refugees Misdirected: Information Barriers in the Exercise of Legal Rights.
Christopher Bail

Christoper Bail named a 2017 Carnegie Fellow

April 26, 2017
Awardee | Christopher A. Bail (PhD '11) is one of 35 recipients of the 2017 Andrew Carnegie fellowship, awarded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for the advancement of research in the humanities and social sciences. Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University. Project title: Countering Extremist Narratives on Social Media Via Computational Social Science.
'Evicted' awarded 2017 Hillman Prize for Book Journalism

'Evicted' awarded 2017 Hillman Prize for Book Journalism

April 25, 2017
Awardee | Matthew Desmond is the recipient of the 2017 Hillman Prize for Book Journalism, for "investigative reporting and deep storytelling in the service of the common good." The Sidney Hillman Foundation honors the legacy of union leader and New Deal architect Sidney Hillman (1887-1946).
Victor Tan Chen

Victor Tan Chen receives LERA John T. Dunlop Outstanding Scholar Award

April 18, 2017
Labor Employment Relations Association | Victor Tan Chen (Ph '12), Assistant Professor of Sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University, is a recipient of LERA's 2017 John T. Dunlop Outstanding Scholar Award for outstanding contributions to research that addresses employment problems of national significance. The selection panel praised Chen’s book, Cut Loose: Jobless and Hopeless in an Unfair Economy (2015), for providing an “incisive analysis based on first-person stories of the experience of economic restructuring and prolonged joblessness for long-term unemployed autoworkers.”
Matthew Clair and Alix Winter

Law and Society John Hope Franklin Prize: Matthew Clair and Alix Winter

April 17, 2017

Awardees | The Law and Society Association has awarded Matthew Clair, Ph.D. candidate in Sociology, and Alix Winter, Ph.D. candidate in Sociology & Social Policy, its John Hope Franklin Prize for the best article on race, racism, and the law published in the past two years. The article, How Judges Think about Racial Disparties: Situational Decision-Making in the Criminal Justice System, "reveals that judges who routinely impose sentences with a differential racial impact sometimes intervene to mitigate the effects, and in many cases, justify decision making that continues to perpetuate disparities," in the words of the award citation. In so doing, "this article provides valuable new insights into the legal consciousness of elite actors and their thinking about the discriminatory impact of their decisions."
View the research

Torben Iversen

Torben Iversen elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences

April 12, 2017

Awardee | Torben Iversen, Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy, is one of 228 newly-elected members to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Founded in 1780, membership in the Academy recognizes "some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, as well as civic, business, and philanthropic leaders."
View the 2017 class by field

Latest commentary and analysis

The 2017 Hutchins Forum: Race and Racism in the Age of Trump

August 17, 2017

PBS Newshour | Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor at Harvard, and PBS NewsHour’s special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault hosted and moderated the 2017 Hutchins Forum on “Race and Racism in the Age of Trump.” They were joined by Inequality & Social Policy faculty members Leah Wright Riguer and Lawrence D. Bobo, as well as New York Times columnist Charles Blow, Alan Dershowitz of Harvard Law, NPR Politics reporter Asma Khalid, White House corrrspondent April Ryan, and conservative radio host Armstrong Williams. ...

Read more about The 2017 Hutchins Forum: Race and Racism in the Age of Trump
Gainful Employment regulations will protect students and taxpayers. Don’t change them.

Gainful Employment regulations will protect students and taxpayers. Don’t change them.

August 4, 2017
Brookings Institution | By Stephanie Riegg Cellini, Adam Looney (PhD '04), David Deming (PhD '10), and Jordan Matsudaira. Adam Looney is now a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. David Deming is a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Graduate School of Education. For more details on their argument, read the full comment the authors submitted to the Department of Education (pdf download).
The New Yorker

The Life of a South Central Statistic

July 24, 2017
The New Yorker | By Danielle Allen. My cousin became a convicted felon in his teens. I tried to make sure he got a second chance. What went wrong?  Danielle Allen is a political theorist and the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard. She is the author of Cuz: The Life and Times of Michael A., from which this essay is drawn.
The Prospects and Limits of Deliberative Democracy

The Prospects and Limits of Deliberative Democracy

June 28, 2017
American Academy of Arts & Sciences | “Democracy is under siege.” So begins the Summer 2017 issue of Dædalus on “The Prospects and Limits of Deliberative Democracy.” In their introduction to the issue, editors James S. Fishkin of Stanford University and Jane Mansbridge, the Charles F. Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values at Harvard Kennedy School, consider the crisis of confidence in the ideal of democracy as rule by the people. If the “will of the people” can be manufactured by marketing strategies, fake news, and confirmation bias, then how real is our democracy? If the expanse between decision-making elites and a mobilized public grows, then how functional is our democracy? If political alienation and apathy increase, then how representative is our democracy? [ead more]
View issue contents
View introduction and selected articles (open access)
War on Work

Ending the 'War on Work'

June 28, 2017
City Journal Podcast | Harvard economics professor Edward L. Glaeser joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson discuss the great American domestic crisis of the twenty-first century: persistent joblessness, particularly among prime-age men. [Audio and transcript]
The War on Work and How to End It

The War on Work and How to End It

June 25, 2017
City Journal | By Edward L. Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics. An agenda to address joblessness, the great American domestic crisis of the twenty-first century.
Luck, Chance, and Taxes

Luck, Chance, and Taxes

June 23, 2017
The American Interest | By Christopher Jencks, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy, Emeritus. Luck has more to do with economic success than Americans like to believe. Robert Frank’s new book challenges us to reckon honestly with fortune, and what it means for social policy,  Jencks writes.
NBC News

Analysis: DACA Boosts Young Immigrants' Well-Being, Mental Health

June 15, 2017
NBC News | By Roberto G. Gonzales (Assistant Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education) and Kristina Brant (PhD student in Sociology). Roberto Gonazles is Principal Investigator of the National UnDACAmented Research Project. Kristina Brant is the Project Coordinator.
Michèle Lamont

Trois questions à Michèle Lamont

June 15, 2017
Université de Bordeaux | Interview with Michèle Lamont, awarded a Doctorate Honoris Causa by the Université de Bordeaux in recognition of her work in the social sciences. Michèle Lamont is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies and the Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard.
Jal Mehta, Radcliffe Institute

Learning Deeply at Scale: The Challenge of Our Times (video)

June 13, 2017
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study | As part of the 2016–2017 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Jal Mehta RI ’17 looks beneath the surface of pedagogical methods in American high schools. What does instruction in high schools look like? Where is it better? What can we do about it?

Jal Mehta (PhD '06) is the 2016–2017 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute and Associate Professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education.

The CFPB Is Making Government More Accountable. The GOP Wants to Stop It

The CFPB Is Making Government More Accountable. The GOP Wants to Stop It

June 9, 2017
Washington Monthly | By Barbara Kiviat, PhD candidate in Sociology & Social Policy. The Financial CHOICE Act would remove the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s popular consumer complaints database from public view. At a time when many Americans feel government is unaccountable and out of touch with the day-to-day lives of everyday people, Kiviat argues, "Keeping complaints visible to the full American public, and not just to government bureaucrats, represents one of the more innovative mechanisms of accountability to emerge from federal government in recent years."
Christine Desan - HLS Thinks Big

The Dollar as a Democratic Medium: Making Money a Currency of Social Justice

June 8, 2017
Harvard Law Today | HLS Thinks Big: Harvard Law School's annual event featuring Christine Desan, who asks whether we can re-design money to deliver fairness in a world in which inequality is escalating. Christine Desan is the Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law and co-founder of Harvard's Program on the Study of Capitalism. (Text + video)

Latest policy, research briefs, and expert testimony

The Great Gatsby Curve: All heat, no light

The Great Gatsby Curve: All heat, no light

May 20, 2015

Brookings Institution—Social Mobility Memos | By Scott Winship.  Second of a series of memos on both sides of the "The Great Gatsby Curve" debate, including pieces by Alan Krueger (Princeton University) and Heather Boushey (Washington Center for Equitable Growth).

Six Examples of the Long-Term Benefits of Anti-Poverty Programs

Six Examples of the Long-Term Benefits of Anti-Poverty Programs

May 11, 2015

Council of Economic Advisers | CEA Chairman Jason Furman web brief provides a more detailed detailed discussion of the research mentioned in his New York Times op-ed, "Smart Social Programs". This brief highlights research by  Sarah Cohodes (Ph.D. candidate in Public Policy), David Deming (faculty member and Ph.D. '10), Lawrence KatzJeffrey Liebman, Jonah Rockoff (Ph.D. '04), and Christopher Wimer (Ph.D. '07).