In the News

Stop the sniping, Washington Democrats. Learn from the grassroots.

Stop the sniping, Washington Democrats. Learn from the grassroots.

November 19, 2017
Washington Post | Columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. talks with political scientist Theda Skocpol, who—with Harvard colleagues Mary Waters (Harvard Sociology) and Kathy Swartz (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health)— are talking to leaders and rank-and-file citizens in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Ohio (two counties in each state) to track changes in politics since Donald Trump's election victory.
Year One: Resistance Research

Year One: Resistance Research

November 9, 2017
The New York Review of Books—NYR Daily | In this essay by Judith Shulevitz, political scientist Theda Skocpol talks about what she's been finding in her latest research with colleagues Katherine Swartz  (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) and Mary Waters (Harvard Sociology). The three have teamed up to study counties that went for Trump in four states that went for Trump: Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Wisconsin.

"Skocpol says she was startled to find so many flourishing anti-Trump groups in these conservative strongholds. She thinks the resistance is at least as extensive as the Tea Party at its height (a quarter of a million to three hundred thousand active members, according to her estimates). It is certainly as energized. Skocpol hasn’t seen a liberal movement like it in decades, she says."
Chief Justice Roberts and other judges have a hard time with statistics. That’s a real problem.

Chief Justice Roberts and other judges have a hard time with statistics. That’s a real problem.

October 31, 2017
Washington Post | Anthony Fowler discusses findings from joint research with Ryan D. Enos, Associate Professor of Government, and Christopher S. Havasy, a PhD candidate in Government at Harvard.

In a recent article in the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Ryan Enos, Christopher Havasy, and I document and analyze many cases where quantitative evidence has been dismissed on bogus grounds. In particular, we focus on a common mistake that we call the negative effect fallacy. Judges often dismiss quantitative evidence by claiming that it is never easy to prove a negative. Here’s where they go wrong...
What Trump gets wrong about 401(k)s

What Trump gets wrong about 401(k)s

October 24, 2017
Politico | Quoted: Brigitte Madrian, an economist at Harvard’s Kennedy School who has extensively studied workplace retirement plans, believes that the House GOP proposal could significantly reduce savings. 
David Deming

Social skills increasingly valuable to employers

October 23, 2017
Harvard Gazette | Employers increasingly reward workers who have both social and technical skills, rather than technical skills alone, according to a new analysis by a Harvard education economist David Deming, recently published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Deming (PhD '10) is a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Graduate School of  Education.
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Inequality in America symposium

U.S. Scholars Home in on U.S. Inequality

October 20, 2017
Harvard Gazette | Harvard Dean of Social Science Claudine Gay convened the inaugural symposium of the FAS Inequality in America Initiative, which will include non-academic experiences and support a new postdoctoral fellowship. Learn more about the symposium and opportunities with the new initiative:
inequalityinamerica.fas.harvard.edu 
Claudine Gay

FAS's Inequality in America Initiative

October 17, 2017
Harvard Magazine | Harvard launches its new Inequality in America Initiative, led by Claudine Gay, Dean of Social Science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Wilbur A. Cowett Professor of Government and of African and African-American Studies.
Ryan D. Enos

The Supreme Court is Allergic to Math

October 17, 2017

FiveThirtyEight | Cites study by political scientist Ryan D. Enos (joint with Anthony Fowler and Christopher S. Havasy), "The Negative Effect Fallacy: A Case Study of Incorrect Statistical Reasoning by Federal Courts," recently published in the Journal of Emprical Legal Studies. Enos is Associate Professor of Government at Harvard.
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The $100 million question: Did Newark’s school reforms work? New study finds big declines, then progress

The $100 million question: Did Newark’s school reforms work? New study finds big declines, then progress

October 16, 2017
Chalkbeat | Education reporter Matt Barnum describes findings from a new study released this week by Harvard's Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR) and NBER. The study's authors include Thomas J. Kane, Walter H. Gale Professor of Education and Economics at HGSE, and Beth Schueler (PhD '16), now a postdoctoral research fellow with the Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG) at Harvard Kennedy School.
View the research