Alumni

Carrie Conaway

Carrie Conaway elected president of AEFP

March 17, 2017

Association for Education Finance and Policy | Alumna Carrie Conaway was elected president of AEFP at its 42nd annual conference in Washington, D.C. Conaway is the chief strategy and research officer for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. She was recently appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Board for Education Sciences.

Financial aid complexity

Navigating Our Shameful, Maddeningly Complex Student Aid System

March 17, 2017

The New York Times | Quotes and cites research by Judith Scott-Clayton (Ph.D. '09), Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Columbia University Teachers College, and Susan Dynarski (University of Michigan) showing that lower-income students suffer disproportionately from inefficient complexity in financial aid.
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The Increasing Significance of the Decline of Men

The Increasing Significance of the Decline of Men

March 16, 2017

The New York Times | Women have fared better than men in adapting to a changing labor market. Cites David Deming (Ph.D.'10), Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and his work on the growing importance of social skills in the labor market. Also quoted: Richard Freeman, Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics.
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Tips from history in an age of Trump, protests

Tips from history in an age of Trump, protests

March 10, 2017

Boston Globe | Four books with lessons for today's protestors, including Daniel Schlozman's  When Movements Anchor Parties: Electoral Alignments in American History (Princeton University Press, 2015), winner of the 2016 Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the ASA's Collective Behavior and Social Movements Section. Schlozman (Ph.D. 11) is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University.

Crystal S. Yang

The economy and the odds of criminal recidivism

March 7, 2017

Journalists' Resource | Reviews new study by economist Crystal Yang (Ph.D. '13), Assistant Professor at Harvard Law School, which appears in the March 2017 issue of the Journal of Public Economics. 

In the study, "Local Labor Markets and Criminal Recidivism," Yang finds "that being released to a county with higher low-skilled wages significantly decreases the risk of recidivism," with the impact of favorable labor market conditions greater for black and first-time offenders. "Overall," Yang writes, "the findings suggest that the release of a large number of ex-offenders during the Great Recession likely had substantial consequences for recidivism," increasing the risk of recidivism by 5.5 to 9.6 percent.
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What Could We Expect on Ed From a Justice Gorsuch?

What Could We Expect on Ed From a Justice Gorsuch?

March 1, 2017

EdNext Podcast | Arizona Supreme Court Justice Clint Bolick has been poring over Neil Gorsuch’s opinions as a federal judge to learn how he might approach the steady stream of education cases that inevitably make their way before the Supreme Court. He discusses his conclusions in this week's episode with Marty West, Associate Professor of Education  and executive edtor of Education Next.

Just How Abnormal Is the Trump Presidency? Rating 20 Events

Just How Abnormal Is the Trump Presidency? Rating 20 Events

February 27, 2017

The New York Times | The New York Times consulted a panel of experts, among them Jennifer Hochschild, Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard, and Vesla Weaver (Ph.D. '07), Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of ISPS Center for the Study of Inequality at Yale University.